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Nicholas L. Syrett

to the relationships, unlike the central role that age difference has played in histories of men's same-sex desire and relationships. Indeed, in the six articles collected here on the theme of intergenerational same-sex sex, five concern men, and the

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Periphery and Intimacy in Anti-Imperial Culture and Politics

From French Others to Othering Frenchness

Burleigh Hendrickson

spaces and French epistemologies. Their positionality as postcolonial subjects and intellectuals gave them a unique vantage point from which to reject, desire, redefine, or reclaim what it meant to be French. While this approach flips the construction of

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Contradictions in Tourism

The Promise and Pitfalls of Ecotourism as a Manifold Capitalist Fix

Robert Fletcher and Katja Neves

This article reviews an interdisciplinary literature exploring the relationship between tourism and capitalism focused on ecotourism in particular. One of this literature's most salient features is to highlight ecotourism's function in employing capitalist mechanisms to address problems of capitalist development itself by attempting to resolve a series of contradictions intrinsic to the accumulation process, including: economic stagnation due to overaccumulation (time/space x); growing inequality and social unrest (social x); limitations on capital accumulation resulting from ecological degradation (environmental x); a widespread sense of alienation between humans and nonhuman natures; and a loss of “enchantment“ due to capitalist rationalization. Hence, widespread advocacy of ecotourism as a “panacea“ for diverse social and environmental ills can be interpreted as an implicit endorsement of its potential as a manifold capitalist x as well. The article concludes by outlining a number of possible directions for future research suggested by this review.

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Tuğçe Kayaal

earlier Sivas incident. The final police report asserted that the headmaster was discharged from his position due to his “immoral character” and for “satisfying his perverse desires” on the bodies of the “sons of the nation” ( evlad-ı vataniyye ). 3 As

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Using Art to Resist Epistemic Injustice

The Aesthetics of the Oppressed and Democratic Freedom

Gustavo H. Dalaqua

their surrounding reality, but also their bodies, desires, and themselves. Following Boal, I mean by “oppression” any act that thwarts the development of citizens’ aesthetic and cognitive capacities. The “aesthetics of the oppressed,” in turn, refers to

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Afterword

The Elsewhere beyond Religious Concerns

Annalisa Butticci and Amira Mittermaier

long history of travel accounts, or the long-standing desire to reach beyond the planetary horizon. The dream of a mission to Mars. Anything but the depressing here and now! At first sight, the Elsewhere is what is not here. It shares certain

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Fabian Frenzel

-to-face experiences remain a crucial part of successful mobilizations, as evidenced not just in the repeated desire to “go local” in many campaigns, but equally in such broad phenomena as solidarity travel and activist tourism ( Ince 2016 ; Frenzel 2016 ; Leontidou

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Mike Hulme

This article suggests that our current (fearful) preoccupation with climate change emerges from two paradoxical desires: the desire to recover some mythical benign stable state for the world's climate and the desire to assert ourselves over the world's climate by engineering our way to achieve this outcome. But by seeing climate either as something to be idealized or as something to master, we fail to see what is happening to the world's climate. It is being reinvented as a novel entity, now co-produced between human and nonhuman actors. Rather than resist and lament the results of this new creative force, we must learn to live with them.

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Julián Antonio Moraga Riquelme, Leslie E. Sponsel, Katrien Pype, Diana Riboli, Ellen Lewin, Marina Pignatelli, Katherine Swancutt, Alejandra Carreño Calderón, Anastasios Panagiotopoulos, Sergio González Varela, Eugenia Roussou, Juan Javier Rivera Andía, Miho Ishii, Markus Balkenhol, and Marcelo González Gálvez

's historical account of the Christ Apostolic Church (CAC), arguably Nigeria's largest Pentecostal church, starts from the premise that Yoruba women's desire to become mothers pushes them to search for spiritual healing across the religious market. Since its

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David S. Trigger and Lesley Head

How are preferences for “native” and “introduced” species of plants and animals given expression in Australian cities? Given the nation's predominantly European cultural heritage, how do urban Australians articulate multiple desires for living environments encountered in everyday life? In examining the cases of inner city parks, backyards, and more general views about flora and fauna appropriate for the city, the paper considers a range of deeply enculturated attachments to familiar landscapes. While residents have considerable interest in the possibilities of urban ecological restoration, our interviews, ethnographic observation, and textual analysis also reveal cultural preferences for introduced species and emplaced attachments to historically modified landscapes. These preferences and attachments are linked to senses of identity developed during formative life experiences. In the relatively young post-settler society of Australia, such drivers of environmental desires can sit uneasily alongside science-driven propositions about what is good for biodiversity and ecological sustainability.