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Reassembling The Social Organization

Collaboration and Digital Media in (Re)making Boas’s 1897 Book

Aaron Glass, Judith Berman, and Rainer Hatoum

realize some part of Boas and Hunt’s long-deferred vision for their work while retaining their collaborative approach. The project explores the potentials—and pitfalls—of using digital media to mobilize past collections in the present and to imagine the

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Balancing the Here and There

Transnational Mobilities of Moroccan Middle-class Professionals in Istanbul

Christian Ritter

This article explores the ways Moroccan middle-class professionals residing in Istanbul have forged transnational connections since the 2006 free trade agreement between Turkey and Morocco. Based on ethnographic fieldwork, the article finds that research participants embrace three interdependent mobilities – imaginative, corporeal and virtual. First, Moroccan television viewers imaginatively internalise images of Turkish society through Turkish programmes broadcast in Morocco. Then, Moroccan nationals engage in physical travel to Turkey, initially as tourists, but later also as job seekers. Finally, Moroccan residents of Istanbul travel virtually to keep in touch with friends and family through media such as online platforms and instant messaging applications. In this article I argue that users of virtual environments have developed into new transnational brokers, facilitating the spatial extension of border-crossing networks.

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Assessing Museums Online

The Digital Heritage Sustainability (DHS) Framework

Ana Luisa Sánchez Laws

Digital materials, the primary resources for the production of contemporary culture, have brought many challenges to the heritage sector in relation to their curation, conservation, and dissemination. Digital heritage sustainability involves practices that help ensure the maintenance, enrichment, and enjoyment of digital heritage resources over periods of time that span across generations. The digital heritage sustainability (DHS) framework presented in this article provides an analytic basis for understanding the challenges associated with the use of digital materials in museums and for assessing how digital heritage resources can be sustained over time. As an example of use, the framework is applied to the Museum of London's digital resources.

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Mark C. J. Stoddart and Paula Graham

social-environmental interactions in coastal Newfoundland. First, how is the coastal environment defined by local tourism promoters and circulated to potential visitors through traditional and digital media? We answer this question by examining websites

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The End of the Beginning

Normativity in the Postdigital Museum

Ross Parry

This article is an attempt to frame a way of seeing museums after the digital revolution. By introducing the concept of the ‘postdigital’, its aim is to evidence a tipping point in the adoption of new media in the museum—a moment where technology has become normative. The intention is not to suggest that digital media today is (or, indeed, should be) universally and equally adopted and assimilated by all museums, but rather to use the experience of several (national) museums to illustrate the normative presence digital media is having within some organizational strategies and structures. Having traced this perceived normativity of technology in these localized institutional settings, the article then attempts to reflect upon the consequences that the postdigital and the normative management of new media have for our approach to museological research.

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Inside the global teaching machine

MOOCs, academic labour and the future of the university

Michael A. Peters

Abstract

This special issue focused on ‘Digital Media and Contested Visions of Education’ provides an opportunity to examine the tendency to hypothesise a rupture in the history of the university. It does so by contrasting the traditional Humboldtian ideals of the university with a neoliberal marketised version and in order to ask questions concerning evaluations of the quality of higher education within a knowledge economy. Theorising the rupture has led to a variety of different accounts most of which start from an approach in political economy and differ according to how theorists picture this change in capitalism. Roughly speaking the question of whether to see the political economy of using social media in higher education from a state perspective or a network perspective is a critical issue. A state-centric approach is predisposed towards a reading that is based on a critical realist approach of Marxist political economy (). By contrast an approach that decentres the state and focuses on global networked finance capitalism ironically grows out of a military-university research network created by the U.S. government. Arguably, networks, not states, now constitute the organising global structure () and while state-centric theory with hierarchical structures are still significant, relational, self-organising and flexible market networks have become the new unit of analysis for understanding the circuits of global capital (; ). However, states still have a role to play in norming the networks or providing the governing framework in international law.

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Dearly Departed

Communicating with the Dead in the Digital Age

Jennifer Huberman

something similar might be taking place now. However, in reviewing the examples above, there are good reasons for restricting the analogy. Most notably, the Internet and other forms of digital media are no longer regarded as ‘mysterious’ new technologies

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Online Documents of India’s Past

Digital Archives and Memory Production

Katja Müller

because the archives offer online platforms for communication at a time when social and digital media have become established as accessible discussion contexts. But contextual conditions are not the only factor for effectively involving large numbers of

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Introduction

Digital Media and Contested Visions of Education

Wesley Shumar and Susan Wright

the way imagined by neoliberal administrators. Rather than being a cost-effective way to support information and knowledge transfer via products labelled ‘intellectual property’, digital media technologies open up new avenues for different kinds of

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Belonging in a New Myanmar

Identity, Law, and Gender in the Anthropology of Contemporary Buddhism

Juliane Schober

technologies, including digital media, further amplify the impact of emerging Theravada formations amid growing communal tensions. New press freedoms in print and digital media have played a critical role in opening up the range of opinions that can now be