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War Memories and Online Encyclopedias

Framing 30 June 1941 in Wikipedia

Mykola Makhortykh

-Soviet countries, where digital media platforms such as Wikipedia serve both as a major space for cultural and social self-expression and “a pivotal discursive territory” 12 for assessing the region’s turbulent present and past. In order to examine how Wikipedia

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How to Survive the Postfeminist Impasse

Grace Helbig’s Affective Aesthetics

Catherine McDermott

, screen, and digital media are beginning to express a dissatisfaction with postfeminist “happiness scripts” ( Ahmed 2010: 59 ). 1 For instance, I argue elsewhere ( McDermott 2017 ) that the television series Girls (20122017) is characterized by

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The Girl in the GIF

Reading the Self into Girlfriendship

Akane Kanai

explores the possibilities of digital media in helping to transcend those restrictions on femininity that aim to render girls docile and passive (see, for example, Keller 2015 ). Other discussions have focused explicitly on girls’ online negotiations of

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Andrés Chiappe

The world is fast becoming increasingly digital, networked, and mobile. The use of mobile devices is a growing educational trend and determines how knowledge is taught and used when teaching and learning. This article presents the results of a comparative analysis of web and mobile educational content, which focuses on instructional issues that affect learning in a mobile context—namely, length, density, complexity, purpose, and structure. It then demonstrates that mobile content is shorter, denser, and more complex than the content of other types of educational media, and it proposes a critical assessment of how such content should be designed.

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Melanie Kennedy and Natalie Coulter

, the circumstances of her death and the debates this generated in the media simultaneously shore up the notion of her having been an at-risk girl, and attach this label to her. Concerns about the ways in which girls navigate the contemporary digital

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Real Women Aren't Shiny (or Plastic)

The Adolescent Female Body in YA Fantasy

Leah Phillips

In this article I explore how mythopoeic Young Adult (YA) fantasy offers examples of living and being an adolescent female body that challenge the dominant, hegemonic discourses dictating the adolescent girl's appearance in the West's imagesaturated culture. I begin by establishing the features of mythopoeic YA fantasy, before looking at Daine in Tamora Pierce's Immortals quartet and Cinder(ella) in Marissa Meyer's The Lunar Chronicles. Daine's shape-shifting body and Cinder's cybernetic one offer bodily change as an integral part of the (adolescent female) body, as opposed to the fixed perfection required by the fantasy femininity on offer in popular culture, including print, televisual, and social media. Employing a reading of touch in order to explore the multiplicity that is available on, and through, these bodies, I question the representational economy dominating the hegemonic discursive construction of the adolescent girl.

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Jacqueline Reid-Walsh and Kirstin Bratt

Perhaps it is more obvious in the present day, surrounded as we are by cell phones and other electronic devices transmitting information and messages in images and words instantaneously, but for over a hundred years the lives of girls—middle class girls in particular—have been mediated to a large extent by the plethora of texts that surround them. These texts are largely fictional narratives in different formats such as novels, magazines, television shows and films, many of which appear as digital media. Some of these texts are composed by adults, often women, and are directed at girl readers and viewers in an effort to establish a direct or indirect pedagogical relationship with them. Then again, depending often on how fantasy and desire is constructed in the narrative, other texts have no apparent pedagogical function, serving instead as sites (some adult-sanctioned and some not) of escape from reality. Other texts are created by the girls themselves and are directed at members of their own age group either as texts of peer education or of entertainment.

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Inside the global teaching machine

MOOCs, academic labour and the future of the university

Michael A. Peters

Abstract

This special issue focused on ‘Digital Media and Contested Visions of Education’ provides an opportunity to examine the tendency to hypothesise a rupture in the history of the university. It does so by contrasting the traditional Humboldtian ideals of the university with a neoliberal marketised version and in order to ask questions concerning evaluations of the quality of higher education within a knowledge economy. Theorising the rupture has led to a variety of different accounts most of which start from an approach in political economy and differ according to how theorists picture this change in capitalism. Roughly speaking the question of whether to see the political economy of using social media in higher education from a state perspective or a network perspective is a critical issue. A state-centric approach is predisposed towards a reading that is based on a critical realist approach of Marxist political economy (). By contrast an approach that decentres the state and focuses on global networked finance capitalism ironically grows out of a military-university research network created by the U.S. government. Arguably, networks, not states, now constitute the organising global structure () and while state-centric theory with hierarchical structures are still significant, relational, self-organising and flexible market networks have become the new unit of analysis for understanding the circuits of global capital (; ). However, states still have a role to play in norming the networks or providing the governing framework in international law.

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Chloe Krystyna Garcia and Ayesha Vemuri

online media, key elements of digital media should be analyzed, including production, representation, language, and audience. Examining these different layers of digital media “means developing a much broader critical understanding which addresses the

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Introduction

Digital Media and Contested Visions of Education

Wesley Shumar and Susan Wright

the way imagined by neoliberal administrators. Rather than being a cost-effective way to support information and knowledge transfer via products labelled ‘intellectual property’, digital media technologies open up new avenues for different kinds of