Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for :

  • "employment" x
  • Anthropology x
  • All content x
Clear All
Open access

Active learning in criminal justice

The benefits of student investigation of wrongful convictions in a higher education setting

Jill Dealey

dual advantage of first, developing applied research skills, and second, gaining valuable insight into policies and procedures of criminal justice agencies enhances the employment prospects of students seeking to work in the criminal justice system

Restricted access

Tobias Denskus and Daniel E. Esser

We review the ontological and pedagogical origins of International Development graduate education in the context of increasing pressures to 'professionalise' graduate curricula. We apply Giroux's concept of 'vocationalisation' to argue that professionalisation risks undermining the field's intellectual foundations in an elusive quest to equip students with functional rather than intellectual skills. Acknowledging ever-growing competition among graduates for gainful employment in this sector, we argue that instructors of International Development should recommit to the field's reflective tradition by creating spaces for transformative education and develop a repoliticised ethos that critically engages global capitalism.

Restricted access

Cris Shore and Miri Davidson

As an early pioneer of market-led institutional reforms and New Public Management policies, New Zealand arguably has one of the most 'neoliberalised' tertiary education sectors in the world. This article reports on a recent academic dispute concerning the attempt by management to introduce a new category of casualised academic employee within one of the country's largest research universities. It is based on a fieldwork study, including document analysis, interviews and the participation of both authors in union and activist activities arising from the dispute. Whilst some academics may collude in the new regimes of governance that these reforms have created, we suggest that 'collusion' and 'resistance' are inadequate terms for explaining how academic behaviour and subjectivities are being reshaped in the modern neoliberal university. We argue for a more theoretically nuanced and situational account that acknowledges the wider legal and systemic constraints that these reforms have created. To do this, we problematise the concept of collusion and reframe it according to three different categories: 'conscious complicity', 'unwitting complicity' and 'coercive complicity'. We ask, what happens when one must 'collude' in order to resist, or when certain forms of opposition are rendered impossible by the terms of one's employment contract? We conclude by reflecting on ways in which academics understand and engage with the policies of university managers in contexts where changes to the framework governing employment relations have rendered conventional forms of resistance increasingly problematic, if not illegal.

Restricted access

Karolina S. Follis and Christian R. Rogler

In 2004, Susan Brin Hyatt reported from a roundtable session organised by the American Anthropological Association ‘a dispiriting picture of academic life in the early years of the 21st century’, due to, amongst other things, ‘the casualization of the academic workforce’ (Hyatt 2004: 25–26). Less than a decade later, Joëlle Fanghanel notes that the ‘increased casualization of academic staff [has] significantly affected the evolution of academic work and working patterns’ (2012: 5). Casualisation takes different forms in different academic contexts, from the ‘adjunctification’ of teaching in the U.S.A. to precarious grant-funded postdoc positions common in Europe and the U.K. and the efforts to introduce other forms of temporary academic employment in New Zealand (Shore and Davidson 2014) and Australia (Barcan 2014). Seeking to contribute to these and other current discussions on the future of research and higher education in the era of privatisation and funding cuts, Hana Cervinkova and Karolina Follis convened the panel Anthropology as a Vocation and Occupation, held on 3 August 2014 at the 13th Biennial Conference of the European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) in Tallinn, Estonia.

Open access

Penny Welch and Susan Wright

students’ chances of employment. The second article is a collaborative autoethnography by Saran Stewart, Chayla Haynes and Kristin Deal about the doctoral programme in higher education they studied at the University of Denver. The programme had been

Open access

Olivia Mason and Nick Megoran

of deregulation, economic inequality, union busting, and a shift from employment to low-wage temporary contracts’ ( 2017: 2–3 ). Precarity has become an increasingly dominant frame in critical studies of labour and employment relations more broadly

Free access

Susan Wright and Penny Welch

disciplines. This initiative grew out of the Department of Employment’s earlier strategy to fund disciplinary national networks. Sue Wright had set up and run the National Network for Teaching and Learning in Anthropology (NNTLA, 1994–1999) for academics and

Restricted access

Sarah Amsler

academic labour (through casualisation, performance-based employment and the abolition of academic tenure), pedagogical relationships (with the legal redefinition of students as both capital and consumers), research infrastructure (through the

Restricted access

Barbara Grant and Penny Welch

‘huge bureaucracies with minute standardisation of their operations, but in contrast to previous bureaucracies, many only offer safe employment and career prospects to a few of their employees’ (p. 127). In the rest of this chapter and Chapter 7

Open access

Becoming a global citizen?

Developing community-facing learning in the social sciences

Jane Booth

narrowly conceived as enhancing employment prospects. Instead, place-based learning, by drawing on the principles of social pedagogy, cultural-based learning and co-production, could embrace alternative ideas from communities on the margins – how they