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Carl Plantinga

Screen Stories: Emotion and the Ethics of Engagement (hereafter Screen Stories ) provides a framework for an ethics of long-form storytelling on screens. The book conceives of ethics as the “ecology of storytelling.” We likely all agree that the

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Jane Stadler

Carl Plantinga's Screen Stories: Emotion and the Ethics of Engagement (2018) comes alive with vivid examples that illuminate how emotional engagement with film and television informs ethical life as characterization, narration, and style

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Synthetic Beings and Synthespian Ethics

Embodiment Technologies in Science/Fiction

Jane Stadler

screen and off, this article questions what biotechnological ethics means in 2019, the year in which Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982) is set. Film and television offer rich cultural imaginings of possible scientific and technological miracles, and

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William Brown

Do films that challenge us to turn away from the screen as a result of their depictions of violence raise issues about the ethics not of regarding the pain of others, but of watching films as a whole? Drawing on Stanley Cavell's notion of revulsion, recent investigations into “extreme“ cinema and, Antonin Artaud's concept of a “theater of cruelty,“ this article argues that watching violence on screen is not necessarily a negative and voyeuristic exercise, but that it can be good for viewers to see graphic violence on screen. This is not simply a question of viewing onscreen violence per se. What also is important is that the filmmakers adopt a set of stylistic techniques that are defined here as “cruel.“ Films (typically art house films) that adopt these techniques encourage viewers not to view violence for entertainment, but rather they encourage viewers to understand the potential in all humans to commit such acts. Such an understanding in turn forces us to lead our lives in an ethical fashion, whereby we do not unthinkingly follow a moral code, but rather choose and take responsibility for what we do. Furthermore, it encourages an “ethical“ mode of film spectatorship in general: we watch films to learn not just voyeuristically about others, but also about what we ourselves could become.

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Carl Plantinga

JINHEE CHOI AND MATTIAS FREY, EDS., CINE-ETHICS: ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF FILM THEORY, PRACTICE, AND SPECTATORSHIP

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Guest Editor's Introduction

Phenomenology Encounters Cognitivism

Robert Sinnerbrink

emotion, ethics, and cinematic experience, drawing on phenomenological and cognitivist perspectives, and showing how theoretical reflection on cinematic experience works hand-in-hand with close analysis of particular films. This issue features authors

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Malcolm Turvey

to his theory. His book is subtitled “Emotion and the Ethics of Engagement,” and he states on the first page of the introduction that it is about “the emotional power of screen stories that makes ethical criticism vital” (1). “Affect and emotion are

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Grey Gardens and the Problem of Objectivity

Notes on the Ethics of Observational Documentary

Mathew Abbott

even claimed that an attitude of contempt for subjects lay at the heart of works of direct cinema. Singling out the Maysles, Calvin Pryluck raised related objections regarding the ethics of observational works, referring to invasions of privacy, the

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Toward a Model of Distributed Affectivity for Cinematic Ethics

Ethical Experience, Trauma, and History

Philip Martin

. In some explorations of cinematic ethics that do not center on empathy, affective connections between spectators and characters may be understood as providing a “synthesis of perspectives which offers insight into the ways in which we perceive and

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Wyatt Moss-Wellington

), pedagogical uses of cinema, and exploration of the ethics of dissonance. Instead of generalizing the politics of dissonance reduction, we might look at specific instances of dissonance and their relative ability to inspire attitudinal or behavioral change