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Carl Plantinga

Screen Stories: Emotion and the Ethics of Engagement (hereafter Screen Stories ) provides a framework for an ethics of long-form storytelling on screens. The book conceives of ethics as the “ecology of storytelling.” We likely all agree that the

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Jane Stadler

Carl Plantinga's Screen Stories: Emotion and the Ethics of Engagement (2018) comes alive with vivid examples that illuminate how emotional engagement with film and television informs ethical life as characterization, narration, and style

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Synthetic Beings and Synthespian Ethics

Embodiment Technologies in Science/Fiction

Jane Stadler

screen and off, this article questions what biotechnological ethics means in 2019, the year in which Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982) is set. Film and television offer rich cultural imaginings of possible scientific and technological miracles, and

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Lolita Speaks

Disrupting Nabokov’s “Aesthetic Bliss”

Michele Meek

acknowledge the girl’s sexual desire and agency. Aesthetics or Ethics? In his 1959 essay, “On a Book Entitled Lolita ,” Nabokov argues that the sole purpose of Lolita is “aesthetic bliss,” which he defines as “a sense of being somehow, somewhere, connected

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Emily Anderson

Introduction Alessi and Alessi rightly describe the ethics of new media as an “uncharted area.” They explain that “the production and subsequent use of new forms of media results in new dimensions of experience and effects in general that are

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Carl Plantinga

JINHEE CHOI AND MATTIAS FREY, EDS., CINE-ETHICS: ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF FILM THEORY, PRACTICE, AND SPECTATORSHIP

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Girlhood and Ethics

The Role of Bodily Integrity

Mar Cabezas and Gottfried Schweiger

, might then be reflected in policy-making. Many voices coming from difference feminisms ( Held 1995 ; Tong et al. 2004 ) and feminist care ethics ( Gilligan 1993 ), in introducing bottom-up context-specific approaches, and in having pointed out how a

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William Brown

Do films that challenge us to turn away from the screen as a result of their depictions of violence raise issues about the ethics not of regarding the pain of others, but of watching films as a whole? Drawing on Stanley Cavell's notion of revulsion, recent investigations into “extreme“ cinema and, Antonin Artaud's concept of a “theater of cruelty,“ this article argues that watching violence on screen is not necessarily a negative and voyeuristic exercise, but that it can be good for viewers to see graphic violence on screen. This is not simply a question of viewing onscreen violence per se. What also is important is that the filmmakers adopt a set of stylistic techniques that are defined here as “cruel.“ Films (typically art house films) that adopt these techniques encourage viewers not to view violence for entertainment, but rather they encourage viewers to understand the potential in all humans to commit such acts. Such an understanding in turn forces us to lead our lives in an ethical fashion, whereby we do not unthinkingly follow a moral code, but rather choose and take responsibility for what we do. Furthermore, it encourages an “ethical“ mode of film spectatorship in general: we watch films to learn not just voyeuristically about others, but also about what we ourselves could become.

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Claudia Mitchell

There is probably no topic associated with doing fieldwork with girls and young women that evokes more concern than the issue of ethics. For many members of university research ethics boards (REBs) the very term girls in the title of a project sets

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Guest Editor's Introduction

Phenomenology Encounters Cognitivism

Robert Sinnerbrink

emotion, ethics, and cinematic experience, drawing on phenomenological and cognitivist perspectives, and showing how theoretical reflection on cinematic experience works hand-in-hand with close analysis of particular films. This issue features authors