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Rachel Mesch

This article considers the role of men in a form of feminist expression promoted in women's magazines and novels during the Belle Epoque. “Belle Epoque literary feminism,“ as I have termed it, was characterized by a desire to reconcile gender equality with traditional gender roles, outside of political channels; it was also, I argue, defined by male participation. Focusing on a widespread effort to modernize marriage, the article examines both men and women's discussions of marital equality in the influential women's magazines Femina and La Vie Heureuse; it then considers the role assigned to men in realizing feminist marriage in two popular women's novels, Marcelle Tinayre's La Rebelle and Louise Marie Compain's L'Un vers l'autre.

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Alice A. Jardine

“What Feminism?” is an extended reflection upon several generations of readers of Simone de Beauvoir, including those readers the author herself has been, from the early 1960s to the present. Of particular interest are the serious readers of Beauvoir since her death in 1986, as opposed to the many detractors who have worked hard to tarnish Beauvoir's productive influence. Among the many groups of such serious readers there are, for example, the social theorist feminists such as Susan Buck Morss; the postcolonial/transnational feminist philosophers such as Chandra Mohanty; the poststructuralist-inspired feminist writers such as Teresa Brennan; and the queer/trans readers such as Judith Butler. What we learn from them is that, going forward, the important thing is to keep excavating the deep structures of Beauvoir's thought so as to forge new pathways for new generations to address the obviously gendered and more than sobering global crises of the twenty-first century.

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Attack Frames

Framing Processes, Collective Identity, and Emotion in the Men’s Rights Subreddit

Chelsea Starr

schemata, this article looks at attack frames in an online men’s rights forum. By attack frames, I refer to countermovement frames specifically intended to denigrate and ridicule the target movement, in this case, feminism. In this study, I investigate how

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Whitney Walton

and their influence over men and in French history. Underlying much of her journalistic and historical analyses were modern scientific notions of heredity and degeneracy that occasionally buttressed her arguments about feminisms and women's conditions

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The Good, the Bad, and the Childless

The Politics of Female Identity in Maternité (1929) and La Maternelle (1933)

Cheryl A. Koos

This essay explores Jean Benoît-Lévy and Marie Epstein's box-office success La Maternelle and their lesser-known Maternité in the context of interwar debates over women's roles in society. Reflecting natalist-familialist conceptions of motherhood and femininity, the films magnified three pervasive cultural icons in French social and political discourse: the monstrous, childless "modern woman," the exalted mother, and the "single woman" who fell somewhere in the middle. As both products and vehicles of these tropes, La Maternelle and Maternité not only illustrate how popular cinema disseminated and justified certain value-laden assumptions about female identity in the late 1920s and early 1930s; they also reveal the limitations of French feminism and socially-engaged, progressive art of the period.

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Knitted Naked Suits and Shedding Skins

The Body Politics of Popfeminist Musical Performances in the Twenty-first Century

Maria Stehle

2007 edited volume Hot Topic: Popfeminismus heute , popfeminism provides a feminist approach to pop culture, but it also critiques and redefines both feminism and pop culture: “Pop culture [should] be perforated and rocked by feminist strategies.” 7

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Representations of Women in the French Imaginary

Historicizing the Gallic Singularity

Jean Elisabeth Pedersen

as sexual harassment and date rape in the relatively recent period from the 1990s to today. 2 Karen Offen, who has devoted much of her own scholarly attention to the study of French feminisms in a series of larger nineteenth- and twentieth

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Decolonial Approaches to Refugee Migration

Nof Nasser-Eddin and Nour Abu-Assab in Conversation

Nof Nasser-Eddin and Nour Abu-Assab

? The question is: “Your work is also committed to intersectionality, feminism, and queer theories—how do you view the relationship between intersectionality, feminism, queer theories on the one hand, and decolonial approaches to research in this field

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Introduction

Recentering the South in Studies of Migration

Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

as a means of echoing Scarlett Hester and Catherine Squires's call—in their reflections on “ recentering black feminism”—that we must be “willing to search for knowledge and theory outside of our discipline” ( Hester and Squires 2018: 344 , emphasis

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Blogging the Resistance

Testimony and Solidarity in Egyptian Women's Blogs

Sophia Brown

Much has been written about the role the internet played during the Arab uprisings of 2011, with particular attention paid to social media, whether Facebook, Twitter or blogging, and the extent to which it contributed to organizing the mass protests. Another recurring theme of the analysis of the uprisings was the role played by women, with Western media in particular emphasizing their contributions and debating whether this marked a pronounced increase in women’s agency. My article seeks to respond to these issues through an analysis of two Egyptian women’s blogs. Instead of contributing to the well-known debate about the internet’s capabilities for facilitating action, I examine how blogs observe resistance, exploring this through notions of digital testimony and autobiography. I then consider the issue of solidarity and whether this is gendered, which is an important issue to consider in light of the focus placed on women’s roles during the protests. Ultimately I aim to demonstrate that these Egyptian women’s blogs offer us new and productive ways of thinking about the role the internet played during the Arab uprisings and the autobiographical act, leading us to acknowledge the complexities of both solidarity and articulations of selfhood.