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Chung-Hao Ku

’s Other Voices, Other Rooms ([1948] 2004) , the protagonists are so susceptible to the backward temporalities of return and the gothic that their adolescences become non-transitional. 1 In Love’s discussion of backward affects, “adolescent feelings

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“You are exactly my brand of heroin(e)“

Convergences and Divergences of the Gothic Literary Heroine

Julianne Guillard

What brand of heroine can be found in the Twilight series? What discernible characteristics of a heroine can be found in gothic fiction and do these characteristics contribute to a social definition of girlhood/womanhood? In an analysis of the Twilight series' protagonist as a gothic heroine in contrast to Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, I claim that the author, Stephenie Meyer, constructs a particular category of contemporary gothic heroine. Drawing on the statement made by the novel's leading male character, Edward, to Bella that she is his “brand of heroin,“ this article plays with the idea that Meyer merged elements of the bildungsroman and the Female Gothic to create her brand. This brand of heroine fulfills the three distinct categories of girlhood/womanhood that characterize both the Gothic novel and the bildungsroman: a dependent stage, a caretaker stage, and a wife stage.

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Miles away from Screwing?

Queer Gothic Girlhood in John Harding’s <em>Florence and Giles</em>

Robyn Ollett

Literary fiction is a widely popular arena in which discourse on sexuality and queerness is produced and disseminated. The Gothic is an especially crucial mode in literary fiction that has a historically intimate relationship with queer subjectivity. Observing this relationship between Gothic fiction and queer subjectivity, in this article I analyze the representation of queer Gothic girlhood in contemporary fiction, taking as my focus John Harding’s 2010 reworking of the Henry James classic, The Turn of the Screw (1898). I show how Florence and Giles develops familiar tropes attached to the figure of the queer child and look specifically at how readings of the parent text implicate contemporary readings of this figure. With close readings that draw on the queer feminist ethics of Lynne Huffer, I consider what seems to be happening to the figure of the queer Gothic girl in contemporary fiction.

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“Loving and Cruel, All at the Same Time”

Girlhood Identity in The Craft

Emily Chandler

this she cannot help but stand out as one of the only black students at the school. As the girls become closer, they begin to wear gothic-inspired clothing. Gothic subculture and its fashion was initially derived from nineteenth-century gothic

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Queering Virginity

From Unruly Girls to Effeminate Boys

Eftihia Mihelakis

of popular culture, especially those of the gothic or supernatural genres” (98). In their reading, the authors address the United States’s fetishization of young female sexual purity, and make the case that Jessica Jamby’s perpetual virginity