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Miraculous Healing for the Warrior Soul

Transforming Fear, Violence, and Shame in Fourteenth-Century Provence

Nicole Archambeau

This article considers the crises of plague, civil war, and mercenary invasion that Provençal communities faced in the years between 1343 and 1363. Canonization inquest testimony reveals that both combatants and noncombatants prayed to the holy woman, Countess Delphine de Puimichel, to heal the spiritual sickness of violence. In their testimonies, witnesses relived moments of crisis when they had used Delphine's special relationship to God to escape death, fear, and humiliation.

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Jan Ifversen

healing powers of the body. In its modern use, it instead designates the impossibility of such healing. A crisis emerges when society is incurably ill. Fourth, crisis is also a moment of truth when light is shed on characters and events. The famous

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From Villainous Letch and Sinful Outcast, to “Especially Beloved of God”

Complicating the Medieval Leper through Gender and Social Status

Christina Welch and Rohan Brown

living dead, bodies half eaten away (Num 12:10–12, Job 18:13). However, in the New Testament, Jesus heals lepers (2 Kings 5:1–15, Mk 1:40–45, Lk 17:11–19) and his ability to heal leprosy is seen as a sign of his messiah-hood (Mt 11:5, Lk 7:22). Further

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Getting Medieval on Steven Pinker

Violence and Medieval England

Sara M. Butler

transfusions; surgery with anesthetics; x-ray and ultrasound technologies; antibiotics; pain relief. Most people who are shot or stabbed today survive; the same was not true in the Middle Ages. Without anesthetics, surgery intended to heal sent some patients

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Katherine Weikert and Elena Woodacre

, Healers and Midwives: Women in the Medieval Occupation, 1050–1350” (paper presented at the Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, University of Winchester, January 9–11, 2014). Weikert and Woodacre • Gender and Status in the Medieval World 2 Matthew

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Inaudito exemplo

The Abduction of Romsey’s Abbess

Linda D. Brown

of another encounter with Thomas Becket. Perhaps corroborating a warm friendship or a healed wound, Thomas wrote a nun, ca. May 1170. The letter from “Archbishop Thomas of Canterbury to his Beloved Daughter Idonea” communicates the need for an envoy

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A Fiction of the French Nation

The Émigré Novel, Nostalgia, and National Identity, 1797–1815

Mary Ashburn Miller

opinion, and heal a fractured body: “Eloquence and philosophy: these alone can make a territory into a country by giving to the people that inhabit it the same tastes, the same habits, the same sentiments.” 70 A nation could found itself on the basis of

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Constructing Difference and Imperial Strategy

Contrasting Representations of Irish and Zionist Nationalism in British Political Discourse (1917–1922)

Maggy Hary

fostered by the British government, 31 Balfour explained: “The religious differences which divide different sections of the Irish society are deeper and more impossible and difficult to heal than such differences in any other country that I know in the

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Lest We Forget (Matter)

Posthumanism, Memory, and Exclusion

Matthew Howard

, and one that is extant only within the minds of individuals. Ultimately, such a difficulty would seem to rest on the difficulty of applying the language of psychoanalysis—of healing, recovery, satiation, and remembering—to the collective, especially

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Cècile Mathieu

Translator : Matthew Roy

healing its wounds from World War I while pursuing its colonialist policies. Despite the dictionary’s evident spirit of openness and curiosity, xenophobia, in the literal sense of the term, is apparent in the work. The dangerousness of foreigners is a