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Tracey Reimann-Dawe

Afrikareisende traditions. First, the authors conform to the stereotypical image of the German academic explorer whose expedition and sense of self is heavily influenced by “scientific”—scientificist—ideology. Second, these three explorers covered similar

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Mathieu Flonneau

June 2013 saw the completion of a project to transform the riverside expressway on the Left Bank of the Seine in Paris into a pedestrian promenade, accompanied by a series of leisure and recreation features. This article critiques that project as a purely cosmetic measure for the prestigious city centre, decrying both its underlying ideology and its unintended consequences, and raising questions concerning the new urban quality of life and the moralization of mobilities.

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The “Missing Link”

Space, Race, and Transoceanic Ties in the Settler-Colonial Pacific

Frances Steel

The inauguration of a steamship route between Canada and Australia, described as the “missing link,” was envisaged to complete Britain's imperial circuit of the globe. This article examines the early proposals and projects for a service between Vancouver and Sydney, which finally commenced in 1893. The route was more than a means of physically bridging the gulf between Canada and Australia. Serving as a conduit for ideologies and expectations, it became a key element of aspirations to reconfigure the Pacific as a natural domain for the extension of settler-colonial power and influence. In centering the “white” Pacific and relations between white colonies in empire, the route's early history, although one of friction and contestation, offers new insights into settler-colonial mobilities beyond dominant themes of metropole–colony migration.

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“The Song They Sing Is the Song of the Road”

Motoring and the Semantics of Space in Early Twentieth-Century British Travel Writing

Martin Walter

When, in the early twentieth century, British middle-class writers went on a tour in search of their country, travel writing not only saw the re-emergence of the home tour, but also the increasing appearance of the motorcar on British roads. With the travelogue playing the role of a discursive arena in which debates about automobility were visualized, the article argues that, as they went “in search of England,” writers like Henry Vollam Morton and J. B. Priestley not only took part in the ideological framing of motoring as a social practice, but also contributed to a change in the perception of accessing a seemingly remote English countryside. By looking at a number of contemporary British travelogues, the analysis traces the strategies of how the driving subjects staged their surroundings, and follows the authors' changing attitudes toward the cultural habit of traveling: instead of highlighting the seemingly static nature of the meaning of space, the travelogues render motoring a dynamic and procedural spatial practice, thus influencing notions of nature, progress, and tradition.

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New Mobilities, Spaces, and Ideas to Market

European Travel Writers and the Making of a Genre—Comment

Steven D. Spalding

writers fail to see Africa’s past ideology and prejudice and resort to familiar tropes of Othering. The rare pearl is the writer who experiences something more than solipsistic confirmation of bias and instead embraces encounters of difference that unseat

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Tristan Josephson, Marcin B. Stanek, Tallie Ben Daniel, Jeremy Ash, Liz Millward, Caroline Luce, Regine Buschauer, Amanda K. Phillips, and Javier Caletrío

systems, and the increasing criminalization of certain populations. Yet while Conlon and Hiemstra convincingly track the “development and materialization of dominant ideologies” of immigrant criminality across these different institutional and discursive

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Dhan Zunino Singh

immigrants achieved rapid social upward mobility or brought revolutionary ideologies (socialism, anarchism). Conservative intellectuals and politicians perceived modern Buenos Aires as corrupted by materialism, liberalism, imported fashions, leftist

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Automobiles and Socioeconomic Sustainability

Do We Need a Mobility Bill of Rights?

Daniel Newman

ensure that the needs of ordinary citizens and their communities take priority over the business-centered capitalist profit motive that dominates in neoliberal ideology. The Energy Bill of Rights gains much of its power from being a simple and easily

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Race and the Micropolitics of Mobility

Mobile Autoethnography on a South African Bus Service

Bradley Rink

South African railways from 1910, buses were mobile sites of racial mixing until 1953 when an Act of Parliament forbade whites from sharing any vehicle with a member of another race group. 25 The racial ideology of apartheid was translated to bus

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Becoming “Pacific-Minded”

Australian Middlebrow Writers in the 1940s and the Mobility of Texts

Anna Johnston

supported Australian neocolonialism (which is difficult to discern in most editorial policy documents), we should not assume that readers uncritically digested such ideologies. 31 And readers situated their magazine reading within other cultural practices