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'Those Twins of Learning'

Cognitive and Affective Learning in an Inclusive Shakespearean Curriculum

Sheila T. Cavanagh and Steve Rowland

Sheila T. Cavanagh and Steve Rowland link Shakespeare classrooms in distinctive venues: Cavanagh is a professor at Emory University in Atlanta, whose students are enrolled in undergraduate degree programmes; Rowland teaches at Monroe Correctional Facility in Washington State, under the auspices of University Beyond Bars. This article describes some of the practical and theoretical challenges emerging through this collaboration, many of which result from the instructors’ desires to construct their classes with pedagogic goals and assignments drawn from both cognitive and affective learning principles. Geography precludes the students meeting in person and they are not currently able to employ videoconferencing in this endeavour, but regular exchanges of essays and responses to each other’s writing allows these disparate groups of Shakespeareans to expand their knowledge of the drama while sharpening their critical and writing skills and learning to develop their affective understandings of the subject.

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Melissa Dearey, Bethanie Petty, Brett Thompson, Clinton R. Lear, Stephanie Gadsby, and Donna Gibbs

The main aim of this essay is to explore prisoner life writing within the specific, richly and multiply dependent context of teaching and learning undergraduate criminology at an English university, from the authorial viewpoint of a teacher and her students as budding criminologists and coauthors. This article seeks to redress a continuing resistance to life history approaches in criminology, despite the discipline being formally devoted to the understanding of the meaning and experience of imprisonment in all its forms and consequences. What follows is a reflection on what students had to say on the fascinating subject of prisoner auto/biography and its place in popular and expert discourses on crime, criminality, and punishment, contextualised within the academic discipline of criminology.

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Andrew Arato

Constitutional politics has returned in our time in a truly dramatic way. In the last 25 years, not only in the new or restored democracies of South and East Europe, Latin America and Africa, but also in the established liberal or not so liberal democracies of Germany, Italy, Japan, Israel, New Zealand, Canada and Great Britain, issues of constitution- making, constitutional revision and institutional design or redesign have been put on the political agenda. Even in the United States, given the new or renewed problems of our versions of presidentialism, federalism and electoral regime, Article V has come to be experienced as a veritable prison house, and judicial constitutionmaking (think of Buckley v Valejo) is often seen as much as a threat to, as the protection of, democratic mechanisms. And, most recently, in countries currently experiencing externally imposed revolutions1, namely Afghanistan and Iraq, constitution-making has turned out to be a central stake in the ongoing political process. We are living in an epoch in which the nations seem to be slouching, or being prodded, toward Philadelphia and Americans, as the heirs of Madison and MacArthur, are sorely tempted to try teaching others the secrets of its success as a supposedly continuous 200-year-old constitutional democracy. But to be an effective teacher, it is not enough to be in a position of political-military superiority. One must first relearn to learn and even to re-learn.

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Learning to Judge Politics

Professor John Dunn (Interviewed by Professor Lawrence Hamilton)

John Dunn and Lawrence Hamilton

relations for the international economic relations we have at the moment, and we don't have any mechanism at all, except for the evidently catastrophic character of some policies that political leaders have pursued, of actually learning how to improve it. I

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Learning How To Fall

The Not So Secret Narratives of Matthew Sweeney

Michael Faherty

Matthew Sweeney wants to know what it feels like to be stranded on a rock off the coast of Donegal, unable to swim, and your mates, unable to save you, only watching and waiting as the tide slowly rises. He wants to know what it feels like to lie dying in a hospital bed, having drunk weedkiller because your wife was sleeping with your neighbour, and he wants to know what it feels like for her too, the neighbour also having drunk weedkiller to show her how harmless he thought it was. And he wants to know what it feels like to fall from the twentieth or thirtieth floor, having leapt for whatever reason. Fortunately, he has some friends with similar interests, including the American poet and undertaker Thomas Lynch, who has fondly recorded one evening in County Clare, over lobsters and a bottle or two of Puligny-Montrachet, when Sweeney probed his professional knowledge of ‘death by misadventure’, particularly defenestration and other related tumbles from vast heights. It was Sweeney’s hope and prayer that death came calling before the concrete pavement did and Lynch did his best to reassure him with medical evidence that suggested the system pretty much shut down in such situations, only coming back to consciousness if there was anything left to come back to.

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'You ain't the man you was'

Learning to Be a Man Again in Charles Reade's A Simpleton

Georgina O'Brien Hill

This article examines the role of the sensation novel in the construction of male identities in the Victorian period through an examination of Charles Reade's A Simpleton, a Story of the Day (1873). This novel exploits Victorian anxieties surrounding male identity and seeks to affirm unstable concepts of masculinity through dominant codes of imperialism. O'Brien Hill argues that Reade's novel is unusual in the sensation canon due to the combination of the adventure sub-plot and sensational narrative devices, serving to expose the fluidity of male identity and Victorian fascination with the spectacle of masculinity in crisis.

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Sons of 'the modern Athens'

The Classical Union of Athletic and Intellectual Masculinities in Charles Reade's Hard Cash

Marc Milton Ducusin

Charles Reade's sensation novel Hard Cash (1863) ostensibly divides the qualities of athletic and intellectual prowess between its two main male characters, the Oxford rower Edward Dodd and the more academically inclined Alfred Hardie. Their contrasted pairing iterates the sensation genre's trope of doubled identities, while Reade's depiction of their respective aptitudes draws heavily on Classical ideals of male beauty and philosophical learning. Complicating the dichotomy, Alfred increasingly comes to embody the need for cohesion of body and intellect, thus illustrating Reade's vision of Oxford as a 'modern Athens' that 'cultivates muscle as well as mind.'

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Elizabeth Mazzola

Roger Ascham has been credited with rehabilitating Elizabeth Tudor's image after a near-disastrous seduction at the hands of her stepmother's husband Thomas Seymour. But in many ways Ascham's tutelage merely continues a process the Lord Admiral had already begun, educating a young girl about what to wear, how to comport herself, and how to regard her male teacher, all necessary steps in the programme Vives details as removing 'the residue of her infancy'. This essay examines Ascham's seductions and Seymour's pedagogy with the larger aim of exploring the Tudor classroom, at once an official site of humanist learning and kind of rival space where women were taught to read and to write and to counteract the designs of male teachers. If images of Lucretia and Griselda resurface in accounts of Elizabeth's prodigious learning, there were other female figures - like Katherine Parr and Anne Boleyn, Elizabeth's governess Kat Ashley and the Duchess of Suffolk - who shaped a humanism of the household just as crucial as the humanism of the university.

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Doing Time in College

Student-Prisoner Reading Groups and the Object(s) of Literary Study

Ed Wiltse

Taking stock of ten years of a service learning project that brings together small groups of college students and prisoners in jailhouse classrooms to discuss literary representations of crime and punishment, this essay finds in project participants' reading journals some remarkable trends. Complex dynamics of authenticity and authority emerge in the groups' weekly meetings, as participants negotiate their own and their groups' identities and commitments with respect to each other and to the literary texts, in the absence of professors, corrections officers, or other guardians of discipline. These dynamics are investigated in light of participants' discussions of a range of works, before looking in greater detail at responses to Sherman Alexie's 1996 novel Indian Killer, which are found to complicate stable notions of pedagogical authority and the object(s) of literary study.

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Ross Bradshaw, Sue Dymoke, Joseph Pridmore, and Nadine Brummer

Comrade Heart: a life of Randall Swingler by Andy Croft (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2003) ISBN 0 7190 6334 5, £45

Backwork by Ann Drysdale (Cornwall: Peterloo Poets, 2002) ISBN 1-904324-00-2 £7.95

The Planet Iceland by Elsa Corbluth (Cornwall: Peterloo Poets, 2002) ISBN 1-871471-75-3 £7.95

How Copenhagen Ended by C.J. Allen (Leafe Press, 2003) ISBN 0-9537634-8-X £3.50

Learning to Look by Chris Considine (Peterloo Poets, 2003) ISBN 1-904324-05-3 £7.95

Long Shadows: Poems 1938–2002 by J.C. Hall (Shoestring Press, 2003) ISBN 1-899549-76-5 £8.95

Northern Paranoia and Southern Comfort by C.A. de Lomellini (Redbeck Press, 2001) ISBN 0-946980-94-2 £7.95

Madame Fifi’s Farewell and Other Poems by Gerry Cambridge (Luath Press, 2003) ISBN 1-842820-05-2 £7.32

I Could Become That Woman by Sibyl Ruth (Five Leaves, 2003) ISBN 0-907123-54-6 £4.00