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Diverse Driving Emotions

Exploring Chinese Migrants’ Mobilities in a Car-Dependent City

Sophie-May Kerr, Natascha Klocker, and Gordon Waitt

are diverse. For some people, like the Chinese migrants involved in this study, negative feelings detract from the desire to drive, with implications for patterns of car use. Our participants’ narratives made direct links between transport norms and

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Making a Community Embedded in Mobility

Refugees, Migrants, and Tourists in Dharamshala (India)

Natalia Bloch

This case study of Dharamshala (India), a community that emerged as an outcome of mobility just a few decades ago and is constantly fueled by refugees, migrants, and tourists, aims to challenge the conceptual boundary between a receiving society and mobile Others, and to pose questions about community making in the context of postcolonial mobility. The history of Dharamshala reflects both the legacy of colonialism and the modern processes of mobility in postcolonial Asia. The town’s highly fluid and heterogeneous community consists of people of different nationalities, ethnicities, religions, and castes from Tibet, Nepal, the Global North, and various Indian states. Most are seasonal migrants attracted by the success of Tibetans in turning this in fact refugee settlement into a popular tourist destination, while some have already settled there. Communities embedded in mobility—for which mobility is an everyday lived experience—reshape our thinking about adaptation processes and social coexistence.

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Alessandro Jedlowski

the life of small traders and migrants, off ering, thanks to its economic aff ordability, new, unexpected possibilities for the creation of social, economic, and commercial links with the motherland. The commercial sector that has probably been aff

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The Migrant Experience

The Red Star Line Museum

Torsten Feys

Red Star Line Museum, Montevideostraat 3, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium. Admission: €8 adults; €6 groups; free for children under 12 and and school groups http://www.redstarline.be/en Open since September 2013

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Joshua Grace

Mobility is often mentioned in African history, but rarely is it examined to its full analytical potential. This is unfortunate, in part because in the 1960s the first generation of African historians considered cultures of mobility a means of challenging stereotypes of African backwardness and simplicity. Jan Vansina, for example, used mobility to uncover “complexity” and “efficiency” in African political history—a stated goal of early Africanist historians working to debunk colonial stereotypes—and to challenge the structural-functionalist lens through which colonials and outsiders had understood African identities and social systems. In the following decades, mobility was critical to several aspects of African history—including slavery, women’s history, labor migration, and urbanization. Yet the makings of a recognizable field of African mobility have not emerged until recently.

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Terry-Ann Jones

Luis, an island city of close to a million people, located on Brazil’s north coast, 2,700 kilometers away. His cousin whom he was traveling with was among the thousands of seasonal migrants who journey year after year from the northeast to the south for

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Moving Onward?

Secondary Movers on the Fringes of Refugee Mobility in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya

Jolien Tegenbos and Karen Büscher

Secondary movement has gained importance within the growing policy field of “mixed migration” that is concerned with “complex population movements involving refugees, asylum seekers, economic migrants, and other migrants.” 1 In this approach

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Tracking Skilled Diasporas

Globalization, Brain Drain, and the Postcolonial Condition in Nigeria

Nduka Otiono

This essay examines the trajectories of skilled labor migrants within a global South-North migration matrix using an interdisciplinary framework. Focusing on Nigeria's huge brain drain phenomenon, the essay draws from the limited available data on the field, interpreting those data through theoretical perspectives from postcolonial studies, Marxism, cultural studies, and human geography. The study spotlights the example of the United States of America as a receptacle of skilled migrants and raises questions of social justice along the North-South divide. The research demonstrates that contrary to the dominant image promoted by some elements in the Western media of migrants as irritants or criminals who disturb well-cultivated, advanced World economies and social spaces, 1 those nations benefit highly from Africa's (and other migrant countries') labor diasporas, especially the highly skilled professionals.

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Victor Seow

This thought piece reflects on the workings of modern migration through the prism of metabolism. It contends that the metabolic idiom productively underscores how migration as a process is enabled and evoked by particular flows of materials and energy and how the movement of migrants engenders social and environmental transformations.

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Mari Hvattum, Brita Brenna, Beate Elvebakk and Janike Kampevold Larsen, eds., Routes, Roads and Landscapes Kevin James

Joe T. Darden and Richard W. Thomas, Detroit: Race Riots, Racial Conflicts, and Efforts to Bridge the Racial Divide Bruce Pietrykowski

Adria Imada, Aloha America: Hula Circuits through the U.S. Empire Chase Smith

Noel B. Salazar, Envisioning Eden: Mobilizing Imaginaries in Tourism and Beyond Julia Harrison

Leon Fink, Sweatshops at Sea: Merchant Seamen in the World's First Globalized Industry, from 1812 to the Present John T. Grider

Diana Glenn, Eric Bouvet and Sonia Floriani, eds., Imagining Home: Migrants and the Search for a New Belonging Irene Belperio

Thomas Birtchnell, Indovation: Innovation and a Global Knowledge Economy in India Kevin Hannam

Giuseppina Pellegrino, ed., The Politics of Proximity Jonas De Vos and Frank Witlox

John Parkin, ed., Cycling and Sustainability Manuel Stoffers

Luis Vivanco, Reconsidering the Bicycle: An Anthropological Perspective on a New (Old) Thing Matthew Calarco