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Laborers, Migrants, Refugees

Managing Belonging, Bodies, and Mobility in (Post)Colonial Kenya and Tanzania

Hanno Brankamp and Patricia Daley

—displaced people were automatically classified as noncitizens, “aliens,” and foreign “others” ( Daley 2013 ). Encarnación Gutiérrez Rodríguez argues that this “dichotomy between citizens and migrants is embedded in a racializing logic produced within social

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The temporality of illegality

Experiences of undocumented Latin American migrants in London

Ana Gutiérrez Garza

them in the market. It is a busy place with a subway station and several bus stops that connect South London to the center and east of the city. Because of the strong presence of migrants, it is one of the places surveyed by the police and by the Border

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Refugia Roundtable

Imagining Refugia: Thinking Outside the Current Refugee Regime

Nicholas Van Hear, Veronique Barbelet, Christina Bennett, and Helma Lutz

The refugee and migration summits in the US in September 2016 rounded off no fewer than seven major international meetings in that year that set out to solve the refugee and migrant “crisis” that escalated from around 2015 ( Migration Policy

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Migrant Residents in Search of Residences

Locating Structural Violence at the Interstices of Bureaucracies

Megan Sheehan

Over the past 20 years, migration to Chile has increased dramatically in size and scope, driven by Chile’s return to democracy, growing economy, and demand for unskilled labor. As migrants settle in Chile, they face numerous encounters with

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Introduction to the Issue

Encountering Hospitality and Hostility

Mette Louise Berg and Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

towards migrants around the world and in different historical contexts. Our contributors examine questions that are at the core of diverse encounters, including how and why different actors have responded to the actual, prospective, and imagined arrival of

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Rachel Rosen and Sarah Crafter

control of national borders ( Gabrielatos and Baker 2008 ), with migrants representing a “drain” on fiscal systems ( Caviedes 2015 ). In these accounts, “the nation” is frequently presented in nostalgic and xenophobic terms, with migrants constituted as a

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Classifying the “ideal migrant worker”

Mexican and Jamaican transnational farmworkers in Canada

Janet McLaughlin

This article analyzes the ideology and practice of multi-unit competition that pervades neoliberal subjectivities and produces the “ideal” flexible worker within contemporary global capitalism. It demonstrates how state and capitalist interests converge to influence the selection of the ideal transnational migrant worker, how prospective migrants adapt to these expectations, and the consequences of such enactments, particularly for migrants, but also for the societies in which they live and work. Multiple levels of actors—employers, state bureaucrats, and migrants themselves—collude in producing the flexible, subaltern citizen, which includes constructions and relations of class, race, gender, and nationality/citizenship. The case study focuses on Mexican and Jamaican participants in Canada's Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program, a managed migration program that legally employs circular migrant farmworkers from Mexico and several English-speaking Caribbean countries in Canadian agriculture.

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Cross-Border Networks

Labour Migration from Iran to the Arab Countries of the Persian Gulf

Shahnaz R. Nadjmabadi

This article examines migration between the Iranian coastal regions of the Persian Gulf and the nearby Arab countries. At the centre of the research are questions about cross-border relationships, the construction of transnational spaces in border migration and strategies for maintaining networks in both the home and host countries. The transnational space connecting the Iranian coastal region and the Arab countries resembles other cases of border migration. However, unlike previous studies on border migration, this analysis situates the development of transnational spaces of migrants' lives within the deep-rooted common and historical perspectives in the countries on both sides of the Persian Gulf.

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Politicizing the Transnational

On Implications for Migrants, Refugees, and Scholarship

Riina Isotalo

This article discusses the politicization of the transnational paradigm in terms of development and security, refugee and migrant regimes, and transnational practices. The analysis makes two principal arguments. The first is that diasporas and mobility in general have been both securitized and developmentalized. These two processes are intertwined but also contradictory. While migration is seen as a development resource, 'uncontrolled' population flows—particularly of refugees—are looked upon as security threats by states and policy makers. This duo-faceted approach is at the root of the politicization of the transnational paradigm. The second argument of this text is that this politicization and the neo-liberal mega-trend are also entwined, despite the fact that the scholars who introduced transnationalism to migration research saw it as reflecting a process of globalization 'from below'.

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Liliana L. Jubilut

Introduction A whole-of-society approach to migration and the protection of refugees and other migrants—that is, an approach in which not only governments and states take part in initiatives and policies, but rather all societal sectors are in