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“Did You Teach Us to Do Otherwise?”

Young Women in the Tsukunft Youth Movement in Interwar Poland and Their Role Models

Magdalena Kozłowska

empowering and often radicalizing experience of young Tsukunft women during the interwar period as they learned from their female role models how to live, organize, rebel, resist, and fight. I argue that despite the scarcity of high-ranking female leaders

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Traditional Medical Popular Culture in Boir Ahmad, Iran

Explanatory Models, Philosophies and Behaviour

Erika Friedl

Analysis of my ethnographic data on medical popular culture in tribal south-west Iran, mostly from 1965 to 1983, suggests several traditional explanatory models and philosophical tenets that guide approaches to health issues. Empirical knowledge of natural processes motivates people to observe their bodily requirements. The belief in God's autocratic power is tempered with God's purported wish that people use their abilities to take responsibility for their health, complicating the notion of 'fate'. The various models provide health management choices. Traditionally, patients and healers shared these models, acting on the same cosmological assumptions.

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Didier Gazagnadou

In this article, the author investigates, from an anthropological point of view, why many Iranian women (and even some men) resort to rhinoplasty – that is, surgery to alter the appearance of the nose – for cosmetic purposes. When did this phenomenon begin in Iran? Which social classes and ages are concerned? What is the relationship between this practice and Iranian society in general? Is it the result of foreign cultural influences? What comparisons can be made with other cultures? Born of a micro-sociological case, these interrogations address the anthropology of Iranian society, which, like many others, has been engaged for several decades in an ‘exchange process’ that today is commonly known as globalisation.

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Uliana Vinokurova

Translator : Tatiana Argounova-Low

power model of the Russian Empire, which continued in the USSR and is still present in the Russian Federation models with varying degrees of totalitarianism and dictatorship, remains unchanged in relation to indigenous minorities. The capital investment

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Individualization and Ethnopedagogy at Small Elementary Schools

Components of Vocational Training for University Tutors

Nikolai Neustroev, Anna Neustroeva, Tuyaara Shergina, and Jenanne K. Ferguson

conditioned by social and economic factors, cultural specifics of different ethnic groups, and the traditions of popular pedagogy. The leading organizational model of rural schools in Russia is the small-scale general education organization. The preservation

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Ephraim Yuchtman-Yaar, Yasmin Alkalay, and Tom Aival

nominal variable, similar to variables such as gender and ethnicity, so that we can test simultaneously the effects of the groups’ identities and their levels of piety. Method In accordance with this objective, we adopted a multivariate model based on a

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Substance, Conduct, and History

"Altaian-ness" in the Twenty-First Century

Ludek Broz

Since the early 1990s the Altai Republic has been experiencing a dispute about its archaeological heritage. This article deals with one aspect of it—the discrepancy between a local understanding of archaeological monuments as belonging to the direct ancestors of present day Altaians, and an expert view of many historians, archaeologists and physical anthropologists who see no relation between the two. Drawing on the work of Halemba and on Ingold's distinction between relational and genealogical models of indigeneity, this article describes the controversy as feeding on different concepts of "Altaian-ness." Original data nevertheless show that Ingold's sharp distinction between the two models is better understood as complementarity in the Altaian context. Historical data furthermore suggest that such complementarity is a principle that has long been in operation, visible, for example, when we look at identity labels preceding "Altaian."

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Assaf Meydani

In recent decades, the role that national supreme courts have played in shaping and determining institutional change has been studied from a number of angles. However, this vast literature has not produced a dynamic model that is capable of illuminating the impact of supreme courts on national policy or institutional change. This article proposes such a dynamic model using perspectives based on the 'shared mental model' and the concept of 'political entrepreneurship'. Adapting hypotheses from the neo-institutionalism literature, it develops a procedural model for analyzing how political rules are changed formally in a democratic system. The analysis also explores the political entrepreneur role that supreme courts play in developing institutional change and addressing social problems. This model is then used to study the Supreme Court in Israel.

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Vincent Dela Sala

Among the scenarios raised by a more interdependent and open

global economy is one of competition unleashed not only between

states and firms, but also between national systems of corporate

finance and governance. Less than a decade since the specter of a

competition of capitalism against capitalism, the start of the new

decade has seen a widespread belief that the Anglo-Saxon model of

capitalism, with its emphasis on equity markets and shareholder

rights, is the basis for convergence amongst advanced industrialized

societies. More specifically, many argue that Italy has not

escaped this discussion, and the past year has been one rich in

developments that raise questions about the possible changing

nature of the Italian model of capitalism. It is not unfair to ask

whether Italy is moving towards a convergence with the Anglo-

American model of capitalism. The election of Antonio D’Amato as

the new president of Confindustria might provide some insight into

the extent of change in the Italian model of capitalism.

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David A. Warburton

This article discusses the evidence of markets in the Ancient Near East. The major points are (1) the shortcomings of the misguided application of the Polanyi model and (2) the ensuing implications of the failure to integrate economic history into modern economic theory. The analysis concentrates on Ancient Egypt, as it presents the most significant problem for economic history and theoretical modelling. Detailed criticism of the means by which the Polanyi model is upheld is coordinated with an argument in favour of recognising the importance of markets. The argument is that these markets are relevant both to long-term economic history and to modern economic theory - and that this must lead to a new debate about ancient and modern economies.