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Jonathan A. Allan, Chris Haywood, and Frank G. Karioris

, economic modernization, and cultural transformations, as well as by the will for change represented by the everyday choices of countless millions” (2007: 109). The impact of such shifts has been realized in the form of broader social and cultural

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“The Dragon Can't Roar”

Analysis of British Expatriate Masculinity in Yusuf Dawood's One Life Too Many

Antony Mukasa Mate

the old-generation white male from colonial times, while Joe is the young modernized, urbanized macho man full of virility. Hence, there is a struggle between the traditional and a new brand of British expatriate masculinity. The issue of virility

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You Haven't Seen the Last of Men

The Full Monty (Peter Cattaneo, 1997)

Julie Michot

may be just the sort of ‘modernization’ of men's behavior which now increases their power as individual men” ( 1997: xxiii , quoted in Tincknell and Chambers 2002: 154 ). Another significant fact is that the men act “as women would” by stripping, but

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Daisuke Miyao

The process of modernization in Japan appeared as a separation of the senses and remapping of the body, particularly privileging the sense of vision. How did the filmmakers, critics, and novelists in the 1920s and 1930s respond to such a reorganization of the body and the elevation of vision in the context of film culture? How did they formulate a cinematic discourse on remapping the body when the status of cinema was still in flux and its definition was debated? Focusing on cinematic commentary made by different writers, this article tackles these questions. Sato Haruo, Ozu Yasujiro, and Iwasaki Akira questioned the separation of the senses, which was often enforced by state. Inspired by German cinema released in Japan at that time, they explored the notion of the haptic in cinema and problematized the privileged sense of vision in this new visual medium.

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Digitizing the Western Gaze

The End FGM Guardian Global Media Campaign

Jessica Cammaert

communication devices such as portable radios broadcasting music, news and outside opinions becomes a central focus for male villagers’ frustration of not being able to control the women. Here, Sembène situates popular suspicions of outsiders and modernization

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Before and After Ghostcatching

Animation, Primitivism, and the Choreography of Vitality

Heather Warren-Crow

-determining force” (1999: 720, 721, 721). As Michael Taussig details, Benjamin credits technologies of reproduction—film, especially—with the alchemical potential to return what has been lost through devitalizing processes of maturation and modernization (1993: 20

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“There’s nothing makeup cannot do”

Women Beauty Vloggers’ Self-Representations, Transformations, and #thepowerofmakeup

Michele White

.1177/1464700106064423 Bartky , Sandra L. 1988 . “ Foucault, Femininity, and the Modernization of Patriarchal Power .” In Feminism and Foucault , ed. Irene Diamond and Lee Quinby , 61 – 86 . Boston : North-eastern University Press . Ben , Esther Ruiz . 2007