Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • "modernization" x
  • Media Studies x
  • Film Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Daisuke Miyao

The process of modernization in Japan appeared as a separation of the senses and remapping of the body, particularly privileging the sense of vision. How did the filmmakers, critics, and novelists in the 1920s and 1930s respond to such a reorganization of the body and the elevation of vision in the context of film culture? How did they formulate a cinematic discourse on remapping the body when the status of cinema was still in flux and its definition was debated? Focusing on cinematic commentary made by different writers, this article tackles these questions. Sato Haruo, Ozu Yasujiro, and Iwasaki Akira questioned the separation of the senses, which was often enforced by state. Inspired by German cinema released in Japan at that time, they explored the notion of the haptic in cinema and problematized the privileged sense of vision in this new visual medium.

Restricted access

Digitizing the Western Gaze

The End FGM Guardian Global Media Campaign

Jessica Cammaert

communication devices such as portable radios broadcasting music, news and outside opinions becomes a central focus for male villagers’ frustration of not being able to control the women. Here, Sembène situates popular suspicions of outsiders and modernization

Restricted access

Before and After Ghostcatching

Animation, Primitivism, and the Choreography of Vitality

Heather Warren-Crow

-determining force” (1999: 720, 721, 721). As Michael Taussig details, Benjamin credits technologies of reproduction—film, especially—with the alchemical potential to return what has been lost through devitalizing processes of maturation and modernization (1993: 20

Restricted access

“There’s nothing makeup cannot do”

Women Beauty Vloggers’ Self-Representations, Transformations, and #thepowerofmakeup

Michele White

.1177/1464700106064423 Bartky , Sandra L. 1988 . “ Foucault, Femininity, and the Modernization of Patriarchal Power .” In Feminism and Foucault , ed. Irene Diamond and Lee Quinby , 61 – 86 . Boston : North-eastern University Press . Ben , Esther Ruiz . 2007

Restricted access

Affective Anachronisms, Fateful Becomings

Otaku Movement and the Joan of Arc Effect in Type-Moon's Transhistorical Anime Ecology

David John Boyd

“postmodern anachronisms” ( Fisher 2014, 5 ), reveals the anxieties of rapid modernization, global capitalism, ecological devastation, teleological thought, and institutional oppression by examining the transhistorical limits of historical representation