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Whitney Walton The Virtuous Marketplace: Women and Men, Money and Politics in Paris, 1830-1870 by Victoria E. Thompson

Catherine Bertho Lavenir Marketing Michelin: Advertising and Cultural Identity in Twentieth-Century France by Stephen L. Harp

Robert O. Paxton France: The Dark Years, 1940-44 by Julian Jackson

Marianne in Chains by Robert Gildea

Gérard Grunberg François Mitterrand: The Last French President by Ronald Tiersky

Martin A. Schain The Dignity of Working Men by Michèle Lamont

Public Attitudes Toward Immigration in the United States, France and Germany by Joel S. Fetzer

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Père Marie-Benoît and Joseph Bass

The Rescue of Jews in Marseille and Nice, 1940-1943

Susan Zuccotti

Père Marie-Benoît was a French Capuchin priest who helped rescue thousands of Jews in Marseille, Nice, and Rome during the Holocaust. Unlike most non-Jewish rescuers, however, he worked regularly with courageous, dynamic Jewish men who became close personal friends. This article examines his cooperation with his first Jewish associate, Joseph Bass, who set up the Service André for Jewish rescue in Marseille. With Bass and his assistants, Père Marie-Benoît hid Jews in small units throughout the region; created networks to supply fugitives with food, documents, money, and moral support; enlisted help from sympathetic local bureaucrats; and avoided dependence on large Jewish assistance organizations. Working together, the Jews and non-Jews were much more effective than either group could have been alone. Père Marie-Benoît later applied these techniques to rescue activities in Rome. This article also examines why Père Marie-Benoît became involved in Jewish rescue in the first place, and shows that his wartime experiences determined his subsequent lifelong dedication to Jewish-Christian reconciliation.

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Basil Kingstone

For over fifty years Francis Jeanson has been one of the world’s exemplary radical thinkers and actors. We Sartreans know him as the author of one of the earliest, and still most insightful, books on Sartre’s philosophy, Le Problème moral et la philosophie de Jean-Paul Sartre [Available in translation. See Sartre and the Problem of Morality, Bloomington, 1980], Sartre par lui-même, and Sartre dans sa vie, as well as of the review of Camus’ L’Homme révolté [The Rebel, New York, 1954] which instigated the Sartre/Camus break. Then came Algeria. As his biographer writes, “His intervention against the Algerian War shapes our collective destiny. Without Francis Jeanson, the resistance of French intellectuals to this colonial war would have been different” (Marie-Pierre Ulluoa, Francis Jeanson: un intellectuel en dissidence [Paris: Berg International, 2001], 244). At the beginning of the insurrection he and his first wife wrote a book about French colonialism and its effects on Algeria. He then organized the Jeanson network, the “porteurs des valises” who hid Algerian activists and deserters from the French army, and raised money for the FLN. In this role he lived underground for several years and was tried and sentenced in absentia to 10 years prison, a sentence which was only commuted at the end of the war. Jeanson was invited to Chalon-sur-Saône to direct its House of Culture and then worked as a philosopher participating in a continuing education program for psychiatrists in a mental hospital. He then returned to a small family house in Claouey, on the Bassin d’Arcachon, where he has continued to write and involve himself in such activities as the France-Sarajevo Association, which has encouraged a multi-ethnic Bosnia.

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Scott Gunther

amounts of money instead on discreet luxuries. In a nutshell, as Brooks recently told me in a telephone interview, “the shorthand version is that bobos are people with ’60s values and ’90s money.” 2 In his book he explains that, “when faced with a tension

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Frédéric Viguier

category of professional political operatives—young, passionate about electoral politics, and highly educated—first appeared in the United States, where the money allocated to political campaigns is in abundant supply. They followed the path opened by the

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The Origins of the Stanley Hoffmann We Knew

Some Comparisons on his Vichy Years with My Family Story

Peter Gourevitch

had to pay. How could they afford these fees, as well as train fares, hotels, and meals? I think the money came from the various agencies helping them, such as the JDC (Jewish Distribution Committee) also known as the JOINT (Jewish Joint Distribution

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Sociality, Seriousness, and Cynicism

A Response to Ronald Santoni on Bad Faith

Jonathan Webber

low pay and poor working conditions in order to stay alive. In this case, the project of earning money through that job is a way of pursuing the project of staying alive ( BN , 574). But the project of earning money this way is not entailed by the

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The Rhizomatic Algerian Revolution in Three Twenty-First- Century Transnational Documentaries

Algérie tours, détours (2006), La Chine est encore loin (2009), Fidaï (2012)

Nicole Beth Wallenbrock

portion of Algerian money, perhaps finds, in some measure, an Algerian public. However, any money earned by La Chine est encore loin derives from France, whether it be through theaters, television or a commercial DVD release, proving the former empire

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The Office de la Famille Française

Familialism and the National Revolution in 1940s Morocco

Margaret Cook Andersen

the amount of money disbursed to individual families, and occasionally the addition of new family benefits. By 1941 the budget of the FFO was a robust 10.5 million (more than three times the budget of the prewar OFN) and then 14.5 million in 1942. 45

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Vincent Pons

only those contacts with voters that take place within the last weeks before the election actually matter. 6 Candidates and their campaign teams must allocate these limited resources—money, people, and time—to a wide array of potential uses. Until