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Sicilian Futures in the Making

Living Species and the Latency of Biological and Environmental Threats

Mara Benadusi

Discourses and practices of anticipation occupy a hypertrophic space in contexts where uncontrolled industrial growth has inflicted grave damage on peoples and territories, even triggering environmental disasters. This article explores the use of nonhuman species as anticipatory devices in a petrochemical terminal in Sicily, focusing on public representations of three species: scavenger bacteria that play a cleansing role and underline citizens’ moral responsibility to secure their best possible futures through bioscience; migrating flamingos that breed under the petrochemical chimneys, raising the possibility of hopefulness by highlighting ecosystem resilience; and fish affected by spina bifida, which reveal human health status in advance, communicating the need to live in preparation for potential diseases. The analysis reveals the highly contentious character of these anticipatory devices and the contested ideas about possible futures they imply, thus shedding light on the ecological frictions that have repercussions locally and globally, in discourse and social practice.

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Nigel Rapport

I am grateful (once more) for the attention Don Gardner has paid to my work, in particular to arguments pertaining to individuality and its relation to the aspirations of the social sciences. Let me begin with overlaps he sees between us: (a) prevailing images of what anthropology needed to be, historically (in order to be an adequate science) have led to too great an emphasis on developing taxonomies of cultural variation, along with the generalising and essentialising descriptions this entailed; (b) some of social science’s taken-for-granted vocabulary (such as ‘role’ or ‘status’) hampers our understanding of the nature of human agents and the springs of that agency; (c) questions of will and freedom, choice and moral responsibility are subtle and important; engaging with these is a necessary step for strengthening the social sciences, which cannot escape their philosophical roots. Notwithstanding, Gardner would take me to task for my understanding of causation, for not adopting a reasonable view on the hoary issue of ‘free will’ and for not taking account of post-genecentric accounts of human-evolutionary process.

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Encountering the Supernatural

A Phenomenological Account of Mind

Julia Cassaniti and Tanya Marie Luhrmann

In this article we compare the encounter with the supernatural—experiences in which a person senses the immaterial—in Thailand and in the United States. These experiences appear to be shaped by different conceptions of the mind. In the US, there is a sharp, natural division between one's mind and the world; in Thailand, individuals have the moral responsibility to control their minds. These differences appear to explain how people identify and sense the supernatural. In the US, it is an external, responsive agent; in Thailand, it is an energy that escapes from an uncontrolled mind. Here we approach phenomenology—the experience of experience—comparatively, identifying patterns in social expectations that affect the ways in which humans think, feel, and sense. We take an experiential category of life that we know to be universal and use it to analyze cultural concepts that influence the enactment and interpretation of feeling and sensing.

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Jenanne Ferguson

questions through a geoethics framework. The lake is a nexus that highlights the relationships between humans and nature, in which a tangle of oft-contradictory actions and moral responsibilities emerge—and possibilities for better human

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Everyday Suffering and the Abstract Time-Reckoning of Law

Reflections on the Allocation of Responsibility for an Asbestos Disaster in Italy

David Loher

moral responsibility. Second, it explores the contradictions between these ideas of moral responsibility and the allocation of legal responsibility in the trial. This allows us to examine how incommensurable temporalities connect and disconnect the

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Humans “in the Loop”?

Human-Centrism, Posthumanism, and AI

Nandita Biswas Mellamphy

, Daniel W. 2020 . “ Responsible AI and Moral Responsibility: A Common Appreciation .” AI and Ethics . https://doi.org/10.1007/s43681-020-00009-0 . 10.1007/s43681-020-00009-0 Willett , Cynthia . 2014 . Interspecies Ethics . New York : Columbia

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The Responsibility to Prevent Future Harm

Anti-Mining Struggles, the State, and Constitutional Lawsuits in Ecuador

Laura Affolter

the legal dispute in the Los Cedros case. While the defendants put the state's responsibility to provide for its citizens in a material sense above all other responsibilities, the claimants conceptualised the state's moral responsibilities and duty of

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Enemies of the people

Theorizing dispossession and mirroring conspiracy in the Republic of Georgia

Katrine Bendtsen Gotfredsen

political decisions on economic gains and alliances rather than moral responsibilities and common goods. Hence, while the authorities of post-Rose Revolution Georgia were officially committed to transparency and the elimination of corruption, they were

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Between Dreams and Traces

Memory, Temporality, and the Production of Sainthood in Lesbos

Séverine Rey

dead: “‘The sorrow of my deceased father oppressed us’, confided Vasiliki. ‘We did not bury him as befits a Christian, since he disappeared in Turkish captivity. So we thought we should fulfill our moral responsibilities regarding this unknown deceased

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An Unpublished Manuscript by Durkheim

‘On the General Physics of Law and Morality, 4th Year of the Course, 1st Lecture, December 2, 1899, Course Outline: On Penal Sanctions’

Émile Durkheim, edited and translated by François Pizarro Noël, and Ronjon Paul Datta

therefore be studied in accordance with the corresponding species of sanctions, and we thus obtain the following divisions in the course: – Repressive sanctions and penal (and moral) responsibility – Restitutive sanctions and civil responsibility – Positive