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To Punish or to Forgive?

Responding to Dirty Hands in Politics

Cristina Roadevin

How should citizens respond to dirty-hands acts? This issue has been neglected in the theoretical literature, which has focused on the dilemma facing the politician and not on the appropriate responses of citizens. Nevertheless, dirty-hands scenarios pose a serious dilemma for the democratic citizens as well: we cannot simply condone the dirtyhanded act but should instead express our moral condemnation and disapproval. One way of doing this is through blame and punishment. However, this proposal is unsatisfactory, as dirty-hands agents commit wrongdoing through no fault of their own. I argue that we ought to make conceptual space for an idea of no-fault responsibility – and a corresponding notion of no-fault forgiveness – according to which we can hold agents to obligations without blaming them.

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This issue of Theoria marks a decade of democracy in South Africa. Invited to reflect on the process and challenge of building a modern liberal democracy and on progress towards social justice since 1994, the contributors have responded with detailed and in-depth analyses of a range of pertinent issues, from public institutions, national reform strategies, popular perceptions and moral responsibility to philosophical ideals, educational reforms, political participation and unrepudiated injustices. Beyond apartheid, beyond the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and beyond party politics, greater and more inclusive social justice, if not immediately within reach, is certainly attainable: through the equalization and redistribution of access to resources, through reparations for injustices, through respect for rights and recognition of obligations, through compromise, sympathy, socialization and debate, and through making sense of change, both symbolically and practically. Most of all, justice will be served, and democracy advanced, by promoting, widening and multiplying spaces and opportunities for people to conceptualize and act upon social transformation in new and different ways.

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Jeffrey Luppes, Klaus Berghahn, Meredith Heiser-Duron, Sara Jones, and Marcus Colla

dishonourable “other” to stand in opposition to the honourable self is in fact a form of disrespect of the former informants and to some extent other eastern Germans (131). Chapter 5 considers these issues from a different angle, that of moral responsibility and

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Heritage (Erfgoed) in the Dutch Press

A History of Changing Meanings in an International Context

Hanneke Ronnes and Tamara Van Kessel

saw freedom being claimed as the heritage of the Dutch patriots. Moral Responsibility for Monuments of Art and History The Dutch pioneers in monument care felt that the Netherlands was lagging behind in monument awareness and policy. One of them was

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Repatriation as Inspiration

Multigenerational Perspectives on American Archaeology-Museum Relationships

April M. Beisaw and Penelope H. Duus

Practices and New Approaches ( Tythacott and Arvanitis 2014 ) address the moral responsibility of museums with an international set of case studies. The repatriation literature is ripe with case studies, but there is room for more generalized dialogue about

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Johannes Görbert, Russ Pottle, Jeff Morrison, Pramod K. Nayar, Dirk Göttsche, Lacy Marschalk, Dorit Müller, Angela Fowler, Rebecca Mills, and Kevin Mitchell Mercer

“colored” people seem to have been accepted within their European settings, and thus appear to possess considerable freedom of mobility and, consequently, respectability. Fauset thereby aligns black travel with social respectability and moral responsibility

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Conjunctures and Convergences

Remaking the World Cultures Displays at the National Museum of Scotland

Henrietta Lidchi

Scotland through its various incarnations. I consider three moments when the museum’s function was discussed in relation to changing definitions about universalism. At issue are propositions as to the moral responsibilities of museums in terms of fostering