Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • "moral responsibility" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

To Punish or to Forgive?

Responding to Dirty Hands in Politics

Cristina Roadevin

How should citizens respond to dirty-hands acts? This issue has been neglected in the theoretical literature, which has focused on the dilemma facing the politician and not on the appropriate responses of citizens. Nevertheless, dirty-hands scenarios pose a serious dilemma for the democratic citizens as well: we cannot simply condone the dirtyhanded act but should instead express our moral condemnation and disapproval. One way of doing this is through blame and punishment. However, this proposal is unsatisfactory, as dirty-hands agents commit wrongdoing through no fault of their own. I argue that we ought to make conceptual space for an idea of no-fault responsibility – and a corresponding notion of no-fault forgiveness – according to which we can hold agents to obligations without blaming them.

Free access

This issue of Theoria marks a decade of democracy in South Africa. Invited to reflect on the process and challenge of building a modern liberal democracy and on progress towards social justice since 1994, the contributors have responded with detailed and in-depth analyses of a range of pertinent issues, from public institutions, national reform strategies, popular perceptions and moral responsibility to philosophical ideals, educational reforms, political participation and unrepudiated injustices. Beyond apartheid, beyond the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and beyond party politics, greater and more inclusive social justice, if not immediately within reach, is certainly attainable: through the equalization and redistribution of access to resources, through reparations for injustices, through respect for rights and recognition of obligations, through compromise, sympathy, socialization and debate, and through making sense of change, both symbolically and practically. Most of all, justice will be served, and democracy advanced, by promoting, widening and multiplying spaces and opportunities for people to conceptualize and act upon social transformation in new and different ways.

Restricted access

Where Character Is King

Gregory Doran’s Henriad

Alice Dailey

, revising or reorganizing the Folio source, the production lost sight of the play’s distinct strategies for constituting character, such as its dialogic structure for suggesting Henry’s smooth deflection of moral responsibility. This tactic was not something

Restricted access

Franziska Quabeck

telling. Richmond’s speech before the Battle of Bosworth proves that his war is fully justified. Henry V’s references are hollow, insincere and dubious, driven by a desperate desire to avoid moral responsibility for the war he leads in France. Even though

Restricted access

Does the City of Ends Correspond to a Classless Society?

A New Idea of Democracy in Sartre's Hope Now

Maria Russo

conception of individual freedom that was not compatible with the determinism of Marxist's dialectical materialism. During that period, his engagement considered the moral responsibility of everyone towards all people, which he tried to elaborate in a real