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Narratives of Ambivalence

The Ethics of Vulnerability and Agency in Research with Girls in the Sex Trade

Alexandra Ricard-Guay and Myriam Denov

. While it is important to acknowledge the abuses committed against minors in the sex trade, this one-dimensional narrative may come into opposition with how the girls themselves perceive their experiences, and may actually hinder an understanding of the

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Tehmina Pirzada

Western rescue narrative in which a white mutant, Wolverine, saves her ( Dar 2008 ). In contrast to Dust, Kamala Khan is a fashionable 16-year-old Pakistani-American girl who combats crime, racism, and Islamophobia in Jersey City, New Jersey. Deploying her

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Robyn Singleton, Jacqueline Carter, Tatianna Alencar, Alicia Piñeirúa-Menéndez, and Kate Winskell

constructed in the collective lay imagination has the potential to inform health outcomes at the individual and population levels and is crucial to understanding and influencing processes of sociocultural change. Narratives are a particularly valuable, yet

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Interrogating the Essential

Moral Baselines on Adult-Child Sex

Richard Yuill

In this paper I emphasize the multiple ways dominant moral and essentialist understandings feed into the wider regulatory norms and conventional thinking governing adult‐child sexual relations. Clearly, researchers are not immune from the ascendant material and symbolic hegemony enjoyed by child sexual abuse (CSA) paradigms. Indeed the experience of the seven critical writers and researchers cited in the paper, coupled with the author’s own experiences carrying out PhD research in this area, clearly reinforce this point. I contend that sociological and Foucauldian insights on age and sexual categorization can offer a helpful tool‐kit for unpacking the contested claims from CSA survivors, child liberationists, and the specific case of one respondent who resists victimological labelling of his sexual experiences with adults.

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Being a Responsible Violent Girl?

Exploring Female Violence, Self-management, and ADHD

Hanna Bertilsdotter Rosqvist and Linda Arnell

positions vary depending on context and situation. We set out to discuss these narratives in relation to discourses of girls and girlhoods in research. Discourses on Violence, Girls, and ADHD: A Short Overview Jessica Ringrose (2006) reminds us that power

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“Like Alice, I was Brave”

The Girl in the Text in Olemaun’s Residential School Narratives

Roxanne Harde

long period during which the Canadian government systematically removed Indigenous children from their homes and communities, these texts differ from most personal narratives about residential schools in that Olemaun chose—indeed she begged—to go to

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I’m Not Loud, I’m Outspoken

Narratives of Four Jamaican Girls’ Identity and Academic Success

Rowena Linton and Lorna McLean

belief that reality can be articulated through a collaborative process between the researcher and participant. Together with our participants, we co-created their narratives. Sampling Although the sample size in a narrative research design is frequently

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Stephanie Russo

's story as a backdrop for the romance narrative of her young heroine, Patience Linacre, in her novel, My Friend Anne: A Story of the Sixteenth Century ( 1901 ). This novel is an early example of the maid's narrative, in which such a story is told through

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Becoming a Gentleman

Adolescence, Chivalry, and Turn-of-the-Century Youth Movements

Kent Baxter

are interspersed with poems, represent long narratives told by three narrators. First, Sir Richard Dalyngridge, a Norman knight, describes his adventures in England during the late eleventh and early twelfth centuries, which include occupying a Saxon

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Reframing Disability through Graphic Novels for Girls

Alternative Bodies in Cece Bell’s El Deafo

Wendy Smith-D’Arezzo and Janine Holc

new neighborhood. The main character, also called Cece, is given a complex inner life through drawings and word balloons, which contain language that at times represents her thoughts (and thus function as a running narrative commenting on events) and