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Communication, Context, and Narrative

Habermas and Contemporary Realist Thought

Navid Hassanzadeh

and subvert his narrative of steady democratisation. Habermas and Realism The contours of political realism today are contested, and in certain respects indeterminate. Some common features nonetheless can be identified and be seen to overlap with

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Leslie Paul Thiele and Marshall Young

mature individual, mythology and fairy tales are supposed to give way to rational analysis. Within academia this evaluation is common. Natural and social scientists typically disparage ‘anecdotal evidence’. Narratives are seen as optional supplements at

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SimonMary Aihiokhai, Lorina Buhr, David Moore, and William Jethro Mpofu

empire politics and narratives while resisting the bias to take for granted what has been written. In fact, to write is to reduce surplus of meanings to the perspective that is being articulated. As a decolonial scholar, Hinga offers her readers a

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Ian Moll

Industrial Revolution: 1760–1850 Two contrasting narratives of the 1IR predominate in the popular imagination. 1 The first tells a triumphant story of Britain's rise to prosperity and global dominance through rapid industrialisation and increased

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Ethnicity, Homogeneity, Nation

A Relationship of Tension

Samuel Salzborn

establish a new, universalistic narrative as a normative model. References Almond , G. A. and Verba S . 1963 . The Civic Culture: Political Attitudes and Democracy in Five Nations . Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press . 10

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Christine Winberg

Narratology is the study of the ways in which narrative organises perception and experience. Narratologists understand narrative as a ‘meta-code, a human universal’ (White 1987), which is instrumental in enabling the re-organisation of time, space, character and event in the construction of meaning in texts. Narratologists draw on different epistemological traditions, and develop different approaches and practices. These approaches can be roughly categorised as belonging to textual, inter-textual, and extra-textual traditions. The textual approach is exemplified by the work of Vladimir Propp (1928/1968), Claude Levi-Strauss (1958/1963), Roland Barthes (1966/1977), Algirdas Greimas (1966/1983), Paul Ricoeur (1985), and Tzvetan Todorov (1990). Narratologists in this structuralist tradition categorize and taxonomize narrative form. Propp identified 31 ‘narratemes’ (the smallest narrative units, equivalent to morphemes at the sentence level), which occur in all narratives in unvarying sequence; Greimas developed a typology of narrative ‘actants’; and Ricoeur investigated connections between time and narrative to typify ‘configurational activities’ in narrative plots and sequences. These, and other, textual approaches to narrative, show how texts selectively draw on narrative resources (emplotment, ways of representing character, hermeneutic and proairetic codes) in the construction of narrative meaning.

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Lauren Marx

African nationalism with a comparative analysis to that of the current political leadership in South Africa today. The question of education, land and race has been omnipresent in the South African narrative and therefore this research is important in

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Michael J.C. Echeruo

Chinua Achebe’s novel, Anthills of the Savannah, is about history and its many models; and especially about national histories and their realisation.1 It asks how history is to be understood and consummated especially for a people without a canonical narrative.2 A recurrent, though not the exclusive, example that stands behind the answers offered in that novel is that of Biblical history.

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Erasing the Nation

The Historiography of African Nationalism in Conqueror South Africa

Terblanche Delport

The story of conqueror South African historiography relies on the ebbs and flows of narrative clichés and tropes. The main narrative arcs relate to historiographies that frame the understanding and analysis of conqueror South Africa. These historiographies interpret history as forming part of an epistemological paradigm of conqueror South Africa: a historiography that does not question the ethical right to conquest. This article focuses on the interpretations of African Nationalism by proponents of the liberal and Marxist historiographic traditions and critiques the way in which these historiographies depict and characterise African Nationalism. This historical characterisation bears an influence in current political and social discourse in conqueror South Africa: African Nationalism is relegated to a misguided moment in history, something to be reflected upon from a distance, an irrelevant phase in the long walk to a multiracial and cosmopolitan South Africa.

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Jafta Masemola’s Master Key

Experimental Notes on Azanian Aesthetic Theory

Athi Mongezeleli Joja

Jafta Kgalabi Masemola is the longest serving (1963–1989) anti-apartheid political prisoner in South Africa’s notorious Robben Island. Although Masemola is well known in the struggle narratives, not much has been written about him and his practices as a political organiser beyond biographical and anecdotal narratives. This article considers, with a certain degree of detail, an even more unthought aspect of Masemola’s life, his creative productions; in particular, the aesthetic logic that underwrites the master key that he cloned from a bar of soap while jailed in Robben Island. Looking from the vantage point of aesthetic and critical discourse, the article attempts to open up new vistas and interests in Azanian cultural praxis.