Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • "nation-state" x
  • Transportation Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Kate McDonald

A major intervention of mobility studies has been to suggest a new framework for the writing of history. Recent studies of diasporic Indian Ocean communities and trans-Pacific labor migration have shown that mobility history can open the door to histories of mobile subjects rather than static nations and, in the process, lead the way toward a transmodal and transnational research agenda. This article considers what the history of mobility has to offer to the modern history of transport and social life in the Japanese archipelago, which has most often been used to tell the story of the development of the modern Japanese nation-state.

Restricted access

Michael K. Bess

The building of motor roads in Latin America, as elsewhere, was an activity essential to the history of modernization and state formation in the twentieth century. Governments, private companies, and regional boosters launched construction efforts with the goal of reducing travel times, linking cities and towns together, and stimulating economic development. In the process, these initiatives also changed the way citizens thought about the nation-state. New highways helped give shape to national identity, not only by making more of the countryside traversable, but also by putting citizens and foreigners in greater contact. Likewise, motor tourism identified and reified regional cultural symbols, transforming them into representations of that nation, and packaging them for easy consumption by travelers on weekend getaways.

Restricted access

Yajun Mo

Overtaking Americans and Germans as the world’s most exuberant tourism spenders, middle-class Chinese tourists have become the most coveted demographic in the global tourism market. At the same time, robust “Golden Week” tourism data, which tracks domestic tourism during the two-week national holidays in mainland China, has indicated a surge in travel within China. Viewed as a revealing lens through which one could observe Chinese modernity, travel and tourism-related activities have attracted considerable attention from scholars interested in China.1 However, marked as a “contemporary” phenomenon, tourism and travel in China seem to have remained largely outside historians’ purview. In response to calls from mobility scholars for a historical understanding of the movement of peoples, goods, and ideas since the late twentieth century, China historians have begun to examine the practice of travel and tourism, especially from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. At the same time, infl uenced by colonial discourse analysis and postcolonial theory, literary scholars have renewed their interests in Chinese travel accounts, both textual and visual, making connections between travelers’ representations and the imaginations of empire and nation-state over the past few centuries.

Free access

Gijs Mom and Georgine Clarsen

xenophobe populism and the extreme right, cry out for mobility studies that venture far beyond the gaze upon the vehicle, or indeed the nation-state. In this special issue of Transfers , we have explicitly put racism and mobility into dialogue. Such is the

Free access

Introduction

Understanding Mobilities in a Dangerous World

Gail Adams-Hutcheson, Holly Thorpe, and Catharine Coleborne

spaces to traverse. Sustainable mobilities, climate change and human mobility, mobility justice, historical mobilities in new perspectives, the mobilities of disease and war, and mobilities and the borders of the nation-state are just a few. At the

Restricted access

Imagining Futures of Energy

Views from Central Asia

Markus S. Schulz

professionally presented with perfectly balanced lighting and well-planned didactics. Yet, the expo did not overcome fundamental biases associated with the expositors’ nation-state and corporate perspectives. The national pavilions reflected a range of government

Restricted access

Cotten Seiler

remained most abjectly outside of and ineligible for modern subjectivity, the political articulation of which is citizenship in a nation-state —Tamara Vukov’s concern in her essay. The exclusion that Michel Foucault characterized as “state racism” usually

Restricted access

Lazy Labor, Modernization, and Coloniality

Mobile Cultures between the Andes and the Amazon around 1900

Jaime Moreno Tejada

the street markets of the capital. The government, though, was increasingly concerned about the taming of a region that was simply too distant to be incorporated into the orderly rhythms of the nation-state. 3 The rubber boom was under way, and

Restricted access

Heidi Morrison, James S. Finley, Daniel Owen Spence, Aaron Hatley, Rachael Squire, Michael Ra-shon Hall, Stéphanie Vincent-Geslin, Sibo Chen, Tawny Andersen, and Stéphanie Ponsavady

modernity’s mobile hybridity. In the process, this work challenges the utility of transnational frameworks by showing their inadequacy when interpreting Indigenous polities and identities that transcend the nation-state (16). In part 1, “Colonial Governance

Restricted access

Nighttime Navigating

Moving a Container Ship through Darkness

Maria Borovnik

, “Reconnecting with Darkness,” 446. 20 Matthew Heins, “Globalizing the Nation-State: The Shipping Container and American Infrastructure,” Mobilities 10, no. 3 (2015): 345–362; Philip Steinberg, “Maritime Cargomobilities: The Impossibilities of Representation