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Paul Gyllenhammer

our respect. 3 Respectful relationality could be understood as the guiding norm for both Heidegger and Sartre. Heidegger and the Anthropocene Heidegger was well aware of the dangers of the modern view of reality well before the presence of climate

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Indignity in Cash Transfers

The Senior Citizen’s Grant in Uganda

Grace Bantebya Kyomuhendo

ramifications for the hapless beneficiary participants. Shaming via Cultural Norms and Practices Another disconcerting practice observed at the cash payment points was the profuse gratitude expressed by beneficiary participants, particularly women, while

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Critical Engagements of NGOs for Global Human Rights Protection

A New Epoch of Cosmopolitanism for Larger Freedom?

On-Kwok Lai

Since the mid-1990s, the international norms for global development have been redefined under non-governmental organizations’ (NGOs) critical e-mobilizations, powered by new media. International governmental organizations (IGOs) have been forced to make policy adjustments or concessions, resulting in new IGOs-NGOs policy regimes for consultative consensus building and for protecting people’s economic, social, and cultural rights (ESC) for enhancing social quality. This paper examines the emerging cosmopolitanism in the information age, focusing on NGOs’ advocacy networks, to understand the new media-enhanced participatory regime for global governance. It also illustrates a new form of social participation, as promoted by social quality theory, in the age of e-globalization and the information society. The paper has five parts. After outlining the globalization project threatening ESC rights, the second section examines critical engagements of NGOs and IGOs for human rights promotion. Parts three and four discuss, respectively, the struggles for ESC rights in shaping new ethics and norms for global development, and the variations of new social media mobilization. The paper ends with critical remarks on the project for larger freedom and human rights for all.

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David Drake

Conventional wisdom holds that the political evolution of an individual passes from youthful radicalism to the conservatism of later years. In this respect, as in many others, Sartre declined to follow the norm. As a young man, despite his detestation of the bourgeoisie, his anti-militaristic sentiments, his anti-authoritarianism and unconventional lifestyle, Sartre remained aloof from politics, while it was towards the end of his life that his most radical commitment occurred, triggered in large part by the events of May-June 1968. This paper will establish that although Sartre supported the 1968 student movement, he remained essentially outside it and it made little immediate impact on his thinking or practice; it was only several months later that the ‘events’ made themselves felt to Sartre, leading him to question the definition of himself as intellectual which he had defended hitherto.

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Sustainable Forest Management

The Role of Government Agencies, NGOs, and Local Communities in Western Australia

Leonie van der Maesen and Timothy Cadman

This article details the engagement by the Department of Physical Geography of Utrecht University in the Netherlands with rural communities and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to assist them in gaining a better understanding of the environmental impacts of the management practices of the governmental forest authorities of the state of Western Australia in pursuit of international timber exports. The study commences with a description of the unique characteristics of WA’s forest communities. It continues with an account of governmental international forest policy norms and the discourse of sustainable forest management (SFM). This is followed by a delineation of the interactions between the academic community and civil society in their engagement with governmental departments in arguing the case for conservation. The final section makes some concluding observations on the lessons that can be learned from the failure of the state government to ensure the sustainable management of the forests of Western Australia.

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Antipoverty Measures

The Potential for Shaming and Dignity Building through Delivery Interactions

Erika Gubrium and Sony Pellissery

.g., Malmberg-Heimonen and Vuori 2005 ; Schafft and Spjelkavik 2011 ). Rik van Berkel and colleagues have written on the norms and discourses shaping professional practices within the context of labor activation implementation ( Borghi and van Berkel 2007

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Concerning Durkheim's 1899 Lecture ‘On Penal Sanctions’

Introduction, Translation Notes, and Comments

Ronjon Paul Datta and François Pizarro Noël

this may cause some objections. Referring to previously published Durkheim material containing the phrase science ou physique des mœurs, Hall (1993) suggests instead ‘the natural philosophy of social norms’ and translating Physique des mœurs et du

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Kathleen Lennon

which is, according to regulatory gender norms, at variance with it. Then, Butler suggests, we recognise that everyday gender is just such a performance. Butler 15 discusses Jenny Livingston’s film Paris Is Burning , 16 a documentary about drag balls

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an individualized sense of powerlessness, as well as to one’s inability to control the circumstances that prevent one’s functioning according to prevailing norms. This has a strong affinity with the constitutional factor of “social responsiveness

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Citizens and Citizenship

The Rhetoric of Dutch Immigrant Integration Policy in 2011

Dana Rem and Des Gasper

integration and employment; to promote respect for Dutch norms of liberty, equality, tolerance, and solidarity; and to foster acceptance of the bases for solidarity, seen as shared rules, social commitment, responsibility, and self-reliance [1.4]. It notes