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Motorcycling in 1980s Athens

Popularization, Representational Politics, and Social Identities

Panagiotis Zestanakis

norms and hierarchies in a time of liberalization, riding a big motorcycle was definitely a subversive choice. It is hard to estimate whether women bikers could express their needs through the existing male-inspired and male–oriented clubs. These clubs

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Diverse Driving Emotions

Exploring Chinese Migrants’ Mobilities in a Car-Dependent City

Sophie-May Kerr, Natascha Klocker, and Gordon Waitt

are diverse. For some people, like the Chinese migrants involved in this study, negative feelings detract from the desire to drive, with implications for patterns of car use. Our participants’ narratives made direct links between transport norms and

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Introduction

Autonomous Driving and the Transformation of Car Cultures

Jutta Weber and Fabian Kröger

user of an autonomous car. What kinds of images are used, what promises are made, and how is this discourse influenced by gendered norms? Do class and race interact with gender in the case of driverless cars? The exploration of these imagined futures is

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Transport Policy and the Significance of Time Perspectives

A Comment on the Special Section on Global Cycling

Geoff Dudley

There is frequently a dilemma in the making of transport policy between prioritizing what appear to be the most immediate problems and seeking to find the quickest and most straightforward solutions that will satisfy public demand; or to search for the deep perceptions that shape social and political norms over long periods of time, and which provide the powerful dynamics that drive stability and change. A common factor, therefore, in all four of the insightful case studies in this special section is that they demonstrate how greater understanding of these stability and change dynamics is crucial not only in the framing of more effective policies, but also in gaining knowledge of the interactions (or perhaps lack of them) that construct transport systems over time. Consequently, they reveal that it is this factor of time that is a vital, but often overlooked, element in transport policy-making.

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Uncertain Mobilities

A View from the Past

Colin G. Pooley

Contemporary society assumes high levels of unimpeded mobility, and disruptions to the ability to move quickly and easily can cause considerable concern. This paper examines the notion of mobility uncertainty and disruption from an historical perspective, arguing that interruptions to mobility have long been a characteristic of everyday travel. It is suggested that what has changed is not so much the extent or nature of disruption, but rather the resilience of transport systems and societal norms and expectations about travel. Data are taken from five examples of life writing produced by residents of the United Kingdom during the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. The texts are used to illustrate the travel problems encountered and the strategies adopted to deal with them. A concluding discussion examines these themes in the context of twenty-first century mobility.

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Sue Frohlick, Kristin Lozanski, Amy Speier, and Mimi Sheller

What mobilizes people to take up reproductive options, directions, and trajectories in ways that generate the possibilities and practices of mobilities? People’s desires for procreation or to resolve fertility challenges or partake in sperm donation, egg freezing, or surrogacy; the need for abortion services; and forced evacuation for childbirth care all involve movement. Reproductive aspirations, norms, and regulations move people’s bodies, as well as related technologies and bioproducts. At the same time, these corporeal, material, in/tangible mobilities of bodies, things, and ideas are also generative of reproductive imaginaries and practices. Reproduction is mobile and movement affects reproduction. Building from an interdisciplinary workshop on reproductive mobilities in Kelowna, Canada, this article aims to push the mobilities framework toward the edges of feminist, affect, queer, decolonizing, materialist, and nonrepresentational theories in thinking through both reproduction and movement.

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From Victim to Villain

Cycling, Traffic Policy, and Spatial Conflicts in Stockholm, circa 1980

Martin Emanuel

This article employs a social practice approach to analyze the boom and bust of cycling in Stockholm around 1980, in the context of broader socioeconomic trends and under the influence of new cyclists, bicycle innovation, and local traffic policy. Within a predominantly car-based city traffic regime, which rendered some mobility practice more legitimate than others, measures intended for cyclists were taken at the expense of pedestrians rather than motorists. Because of a blend of more cyclists, faster bicycles, and design choices based on the car as norm, the image of the cyclist transformed from that of the victim (of automobility) to the villain, and, for this reason, cycling was less easily supported by local politicians. Combined with the second wave of automobility in the 1980s, bicycle policy and planning lost its steam, and cycling declined.

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Masculinity and Autonomous Vehicles

A Degendered or Resegregated Future System of Automobility?

Dag Balkmar and Ulf Mellström

) popular debates on autonomous vehicles and (b) research material on autonomous vehicles generated by the project “Developing Disruptive Norm-Critical Innovation at Volvo,” a pilot study conducted by one of the authors that focused on future designs of

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Ovarian Psycos

An Urban Cadence of Power and Precarity

Jennifer Ruth Hosek

risks and bend gender norms. They are not validated by her mother, who has no time for issues like self-actualization and pushing boundaries of spatial and social access. Evie’s excitement over the prospect of acceptance into the Psycos speaks more to

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Somy Kim

stereotypes, humor, and satire as a “weapon of reason,” beg a viewer to question the ability of this satire to indeed critique established norms and institutionalized discrimination. When we laugh at Sam’s group of black friends harassing a lone movie