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(Not) Becoming the Norm

Military Service by Religious Israeli Women as a Process of Social Legitimation

Elisheva Rosman-Stollman

public figures within the religious community have openly addressed women’s conscription, and while religious female soldiers are still far from the norm, they are no longer the anathema they once were. This article considers this change as a process of

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Sandra Häbel

suffice for it to be a normative actor as non-action can undermine the EU's normative credibility and legitimacy, and any failure to act can impact the EU's credibility and reputation vis-à-vis third parties ( Gebhard, 2017 ). Rather, norm implementation

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Turkish-Israeli Relations during the Cold War

The Myth of a Long ‘Special Relationship’

Kilic Bugra Kanat

Israel for acting arbitrarily without regard for international laws and norms. 25 All major state institutions and leaders in this period, regardless of their ideological or political affinity, criticized Israel’s handling of the conflict and the use of

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Routinization of the Israeli-Arab Conflict

The Perspective of Outsiders

Soli Vered and Daniel Bar-Tal

This study explores features of the routinization of the Israeli-Arab conflict in everyday life in Israel. Specifically, it examines how foreign students view this aspect of the culture of conflict, compared to the point of view of Israeli students born into the day-to-day reality of a society that has been engaged in an intractable conflict for decades. Findings show that foreigners perceived and identified various conflict-related routines that have been absorbed into the social and physical spaces of daily life in Israel, becoming unnoticeable to Israelis. This was the case particularly with various images and symbols of the conflict that saturate both public and private spaces, conflict-related informal norms of behavior, and the central place that the conflict occupies in private interpersonal discourse. These results are discussed in relation to the functionalities of the routinization of the conflict and its implications.

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The End Begins in Me

New Forms of Political Action in Israeli Channeling

Adam Klin-Oron

In this article I examine eschatological beliefs and practices among channels in Israel and abroad, and show that they demonstrate an avoidance of traditional, group-oriented political action, and an embrace of alternative, spiritual action performed individually. This is linked to Israel's shift to a neo-liberal economy and culture in the last few decades, where self-accountability has become the norm. Channeling teaches an extreme version of self-divinity, claiming that a person creates all aspects of his or her life and objecting to outside authority and regulation. It believes in a coming of a New Age of light and that the means to achieve it are personal quests for individual empowerment, which are anticipated to affect the whole world via the “virtual aggregate group,” an energetic reservoir that replaces the traditional group. Channels are engaged in alternative political action, attempting to change the world by virtually pooling spiritual resources.

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Gadi Benezer

This article discusses the reactions of Israelis in the public space to 'mixed families' that include members of Ethiopian origin, written from the perspective of members of such families. The findings reveal that Israelis still react to the dark skin color of Ethiopians in mixed families and that, in most cases, 'black colors white', that is, behavior toward the mixed family is determined mainly by the presence of its black member. The three typical responses are as follows: (1) expressions of surprise at the presence of an Ethiopian in the family, evincing a stereotypical view of Ethiopian immigrants and their place in Israeli society; (2) invasions of privacy that are perceived by the family members as greatly exaggerated when compared with Israeli norms; and (3) declarations of appreciation for/admiration of the 'white' partner in the family for 'lifting up' the 'black' person through a (supposedly) altruistic act. The major conclusion is that Israeli society has yet to accept mixed families that include Jews of Ethiopian origin as a normative category.

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Yoram Peri and Paul L. Scham

their norms (such as gender separation) on non-Haredim. Cultural groups certainly have the right to maintain their lifestyles in their private space, perhaps even in some restricted public space, but they should not be allowed to change the character of

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Brent E. Sasley

will carry the academic norms they have picked up in the classroom and pass them on to those with whom they interact. These misapprehensions may also skew policy analysis and recommendations. This article provides an example of what this approach looks

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Editors’ Note

Threats to Academic Freedom

’s military service as a process of social legitimation, by which even very strong norms can be eroded when appropriate pressure is exerted over time. Maoz Rosenthal brings us into highly theoretical political science terrain with his article on the

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Nissim Leon, Judy Baumel-Schwartz, Amir Paz-Fuchs, and Roy Kreitner

on the grave, as well as the various articles that have been placed on them and in their vicinity. The changes over time in rules and norms linked to the military tombstone were not only the result of deliberations by the decision-makers and those who