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Tony Fisher

The article develops Sartre's remarks on the paradox of the actor in two ways. Firstly, it derives from them an 'existential ontology' of mimetic performance - an 'onto-mimetology'. Secondly, it uses this reconstruction in order to put pressure on Sartre's analogy of the actor with bad faith. In grasping the problem of acting from a Sartrean perspective, I show that this analogy is not as clear cut as he assumes and that a crucial difference exists between the situation of the theatre and that of bad faith. To master the paradox of his own being I argue the actor's technique indeed utilizes the same 'non-persuasiveness-of-belief ' thesis identified by Sartre as the condition of possibility for bad faith, yet in the actor's case it need not necessitate the condition of bad faith. In conclusion, I propose that through the notion of play, the actor sheds intriguing light on Sartre's notion of freedom.

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Andrew Ryder

Sartre's play Les Mouches (The Flies), first performed in 1943 under German occupation, has long been controversial. While intended to encourage resistance against the Nazis, its approval by the censor indicates that the regime did not recognize the play as a threat. Further, its apparently violent and solitary themes have been read as irresponsible or apolitical. For these reasons, the play has been characterized as ambiguous or worse. Sartre himself later saw it as overemphasizing individual autonomy, and in the view of one critic, it conveys an “existentialist fascism.” In response to this reading, it is necessary to attend to the elements of the play that already emphasize duty to society. From this perspective, the play can be seen as anticipating the concern with collective responsibility usually associated with the later Sartre of the 1960s. More than this, the play's apparent “ambiguity” can be found to exemplify a didacticism that is much more complex than sometimes attributed to Sartre. It is not only an exhortation about ethical responsibility, but also a performance of the difficulties attendant to that duty.

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Kathleen Lennon

Sartre’s Imaginary Personages In his early work The Imaginary , 1 Sartre discusses the performance artist Franconay, ‘a small stout brunette woman’ who is imitating Maurice Chevalier. In this performance ‘that black hair we did not see as black

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“One Is Not Born a Dramatist”

The Genesis of Sartre’s Theatrical Career in Writings to, with, and by Beauvoir

Dennis A. Gilbert

attract him to a career in dramatic writing and theatrical performance? This vast subject, the genesis of Sartre’s theatrical career, exceeds the limitations of this article. In the pages that follow, I focus only on the most revealing sources of this

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John Gillespie and Sarah Richmond

the light of the influence of existentialism and phenomenology. Sartre’s imaginary personages make up his account of individual and social identities. He sees identity as a performance of the individual, whereas Butler sees it as emerging within a

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Jean-Paul Sartre

The Russian Teatr Interviews of 1956 and 1962

Dennis A. Gilbert and Diana L. Burgin

thing is to find an audience. All other problems are secondary to this basic one. An audience exists, of course, and if its response to a play is positive, the play can run for two to three hundred performances. However, the overwhelming majority of this

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Sartre in Austria

Boycott, Scandals, and the Fight for Peace

Juliane Werner

performance in Paris, at the Théâtre Antoine on 2 April 1948, the play’s anti-Communist reputation snowballed, especially in the United States, where the play, translated as Red Gloves , proved so tendentious that Sartre took legal steps to counter its

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Nik Farrell Fox and Bryan Mukandi

of what Fanon said, while avoiding the trap of seeking to legitimate that by means of an appeal to the thinking of white, male philosophers. This is not only a work of exegesis but also a literary, philosophic performance that retraces and recites

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Jorge Lizarzaburu, Adrian van den Hoven, and Donovan Irven

plays are enacted and embodied in the performance of real people and bodies on the stage. While this may seem a bit obvious when stated so plainly (as many philosophical insights can be when oversimplified), Ekberg has picked up on a philosophically

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Cameron Bassiri

particular other fulfilling that function and can be further distinguished from the performance of the other in the comparison of her results, efficiency, and so on. The difference constituted by this negation is essential for her identity; it retains the