Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 67 items for :

  • "performance" x
  • Gender Studies x
  • Cultural Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Factors in the Development of Spatial Cognition in Boys and Girls

Assessing the Impacts of Biology and Navigational Experience

Mariah G. Schug

seemed to be more visible in the community and might, therefore, engage in more spatial thinking through navigating outside their homes. This experience, the Munroes thought, might explain boys’ better performance on spatial tasks. With their curiosity

Restricted access

"From the Top on Down It Is Systemic"

Bullying, Privilege and the Schooling of Hegemonic Masculinity

Brett G. Stoudt

In order to better understand the socialization and (re)production of privilege, most especially gendered privilege, within elite independent schools it is important to examine the masculine performances of its students enacted through bullying as well as the masculine environments in which these enactments are produced. This paper will begin explicating the messages received and the representations shaped by Rockport’s hegemonic masculine curriculum and the embodiment of these dynamics through research on bullying conducted with students and faculty at an elite, single-sex independent boys school, Rockport. The data revealed that bullying between boys at Rockport helped to discipline and reproduce hegemonic masculine boundaries; it was as much an expression of Rockport’s culture as it was a vehicle for policing and reproducing its culture. However, not only were the boys within Rockport gendered, the faculty and even the institution itself was gendered. In this way, it was systemic, both students and faculty acted within this institutional culture and held and managed expectations about their gender.

Restricted access

Michael C. Reichert and Richard Hawley

In a large-scale survey of effective teaching practices with boys conducted in 2008 across 18 schools in 6 different English-speaking countries, we collected lessons in a wide variety of subject areas (math, literature, science, art) shaped to fit boys’ particular learning needs and preferences. At a time of widely-published claims about boys’ relative failure to thrive in contemporary school settings, we surveyed schools dedicated to boys in particular—boys’ schools—in hopes of discovering the outlines of a pedagogy that might have broader relevance for boys everywhere. Nearly 1,000 teachers responded with detailed descriptions of teaching approaches that succeeded in engaging boys. Boys themselves—1,500 of them, aged 12-19—corroborated the features of effective instruction reported by their teachers. We suggest that the practices identified were “chafed” into being by sustained interactions between teachers and their male students. In this mutually-attuned, coordinated interaction between boy learner and adult instructor, we found qualities of responsiveness and connection echoing regulatory communication commonly associated with earlier periods in child development. Given current concerns about widespread gaps in many boys’ school performance, these stories affirming educational relationships could point the way to a clearer understanding of how best to engage boys in scholastic endeavor.

Restricted access

Jay Mechling

female characters: Mary Ann and Ginger. (The television series had a third female character, Mrs. Howell, who was not represented in the Scout performances—a running joke during the whole day was “where is Mrs. Howell?”) The slightly built young man who

Restricted access

Training Bodies, Training Minds?

Interrogating the Configured and Configuring of Masculinities in PE

Michael Kehler

discourses in PE that reveal difficult, while at other times pleasurable, experiences of PE and specifically the performances of gender that underscore how and what a group of New Zealand Year 10 boys (ages 14–15) learn about being boys and, furthermore, how

Restricted access

Boys, Inclusive Masculinities and Injury

Some Research Perspectives

Adam White and Stefan Robinson

nature of masculinities for boys and young men in the Anglophone context, showing that the declining social pressures to align to orthodox masculinity has allowed a broader range of gender performances. This range includes boys not having to ascribe to

Free access

Diederik F. Janssen

to others). Other research sites for gender and spatial performance of all kinds are of course the new spatialities unlocked by the massively multiplayer online and first-person shooter varieties, which, after all, cater even—perhaps especially

Free access

Introduction

Theorizing Boys’ Literacies and Boys’ Literatures in Contemporary Times

Garth Stahl and Cynthia Brock

researchers in the present special issue have all—to varying degrees—experienced forms of schooling where literacy is defined in terms of student performance standards on high-stakes tests. We know that high-stakes assessments of literacy “enable a range of

Restricted access

Books Are Boring! Books Are Fun!

Boys’ Polarized Perspectives on Reading

Laura Scholes

are at risk of failure, how schooling influences performances of masculinities, and the interplay of masculinities with everyday reading practices. As I have argued elsewhere ( Scholes 2013a , 2013b , forthcoming ), the underperformance of some boys

Restricted access

Gamed by the System

Exploring Black Male Youths’ Motivation to Participate in Sports

Deborwah Faulk, Robert A. Bennett III, and James L. Moore III

ideologies which bolster traditional displays of gender performance. Although gender norms are changing ( Anderson 2014 ), given the history of race, gender, and ability in the United States it is important to study the intersection of identity and the