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Shadows, Screens, Bodies, and Light

Reading the Discursive Shadow in the Age of American Silent Cinema

Amy E. Borden

grouping of magic and motion pictures as cultural practices each occupied with illusion, performance, and disappearing bodies. In doing so, it sketches a discursive and conceptual terrain in which to understand how figural bodies were broadly considered and

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On Shock Therapy

Modernist Aesthetics and American Underground Film

William Solomon

in every direction like shivers through an immense body.” 18 Crucially, the vertiginous performances that appear (in a perceptually distorted manner) in the film are unmistakably intended to function as reflexive figurations of the filmmaker

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Voicing Pride and Futurity in the Age of A.I.

An Interview with Playwright Pao-Chang Tsai on Solo Date

Jing Chen and Pao-Chang Tsai

This interview deals with the question of queer Sinofuturisms through the works of Pao-Chang Tsai, a Taiwanese performer, playwright, and director who became renowned for exploring the Taiwanese theaterscape with new media and novel performative techniques. With a special focus on his acclaimed theatrical production Solo Date (2016), the conversation inquires into themes of artificial intelligence, queer futurity, and transcultural performance featured in this one-man show. Linking the representation of A.I. interface as queer body with the demand for LGBT rights in Sinophone contexts, Tsai’s innovative solo performance has examined changing discourses toward queerness and futurism in the age of advanced artificial intelligence. The touching story of how a gay man struggled to process his grief after losing the love of his life further raises critical ethical questions, since the protagonist’s true identity is an A.I. robot.

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Looking for Something to Signify

Something to Signify Gender Performance and Cuban Masculinity in Viva

David Yagüe González

The behaviors and actions that an individual carries out in their daily life and how they are translated by their society overdetermine the gender one might have—or not—according to social norms. However, do the postulates enounced by feminist and queer Western thinkers still maintain their validity when the context changes? Can the performances of gender carry out their validity when the landscape is other than the one in Europe or the United States? And how can the context of drag complicate these matters? These are the questions that this article will try to answer by analyzing the 2015 movie Viva by Irish director Paddy Breathnach.

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Peter Lurie, Antonio Sanna, Hansen Hsu, Ella Houston, and Kristof van Baarle

(2009). In so doing Maurice raises questions about the film’s novel technique of performance capture in connection with its treatment of racialized characters, actors, and themes, above all the ways that Cameron’s claims for the film and the studio

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Karen Fiss

counts of sexual assault. Alex Giegold and Tomka Weiß’s two-part project— Genital Call and Genitals on Trial 1 —is an audiovisual installation and performance that confronts the transphobia of the courts and the resulting discriminatory practices of

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Michele Barker

day, however, with an extreme wide-angled view watching me watching it, there was to be no mastery in this all-too-fast performance. As I began to ride down the wave, it “closed out”—the whole face of the wave collapsed down all at once, creating a

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Before and After Ghostcatching

Animation, Primitivism, and the Choreography of Vitality

Heather Warren-Crow

Rebecca Schneider’s analysis of primitivism in performance, “it can be argued that I am not writing about race at all” (or childhood or animality); I am “in fact writing about those categories as haunting—the historical legacies of bodily markings as

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Jess Dorrance

film Toxic (2012) by Pauline Boudry and Renate Lorenz. Image courtesy of the artists. In this performance of half-hearted rebellion, which in fact is a restaging of a filmed 1985 interview with gaymous French writer Jean Genet, the drag queen

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Steen Ledet Christiansen

of mirror. As it turns out, Lily was never there and Nina stabbed herself. Nina decides to dance a perfect black swan performance, while dying in the process. Thus, Black Swan participates in the representations of gendered violence in general, as