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Assessment rubrics

Thinking inside the boxes

Cary Bennett

for qualitative rating of authentic or complex student work’. There are two general rubric assessment approaches: holistic and analytical. Holistic rubrics are used to engender an overall judgement on the quality of performance, whereas an analytical

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Jacqui Close

learning outcomes and development of students, and the performance and reputation of the institution ( Trowler 2010: 2 ). The panel comprised five current and former students from Sociology at Newcastle University who were invited to deliver short

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Eva Infante Mora

Evaluation is essential to the analysis of the performance of academic programmes and is a central feature of the academic accountability movement. Most study abroad programmes, however, lack evaluation protocols, even though establishing them and acting on the results would contribute to their credibility. This final section of a comprehensive account of the reform of a study abroad programme presents how CASA-Sevilla has developed evaluation strategies to inform pedagogical changes in each successive semester to improve student-learning outcomes. The programme’s aim is to achieve a 360-degree assessment by treating students holistically and including all involved faculty, staff, community partners and host families. The aim is also to be transparent in pointing out the problems in the programme’s performance and use them as an impetus for improvement. This section is written to share what we have learned in hopes of starting a more robust dialogue among study abroad programmes about evaluation.

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Paulina Mihailova

The article investigates how university lecturers taking part in the compulsory teacher training at Stockholm University (SU) conceive of the effects of standardised and formalised training on their teaching. The study explores the emotions and responses evoked among academics when everyone is required to embrace the same pedagogic philosophy of constructive alignment (Biggs 2003), adopt the language of learning outcomes and assign the same standards to diverse academic practices. The article attempts to shed light on different conceptions of the quality of teaching and learning in higher education and the interplay between the lecturers' values of academic freedom, collegiality and disciplinary expertise and the university leadership's values of efficiency, accountability and measurability of performance. The article considers how these conceptions coexist and are negotiated within the university as an organisation.

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Ellen Bal, Erella Grassiani, and Kate Kirk

This article is based on our own experiences and that of several of our colleagues teaching social and cultural anthropology in different Dutch institutions for higher learning. We focus in particular on teaching and learning in two small liberal arts and science (LAS) colleges, where anthropology makes up part of the social science curriculum and/or is part of the core curriculum. The data collected from our own critical reflections developed during informal discussion and from formal interviews with colleagues, together with literature on recent changes in academia, leads us to argue that neoliberal individualism, shaped by management tactics that constantly measure individual performance and output, is making academia an increasingly insecure place in which to work and study. The consequences of this insecurity include increasing mental health problems among both students and staff, intensifying competition at the expense of collegiality and collaboration and an overall decrease in the quality of academic jobs and teaching. Although the discipline of anthropology can help us better understand our own conditions, the personalisation of problems and the focus on success obscure the anthropological lens, which looks at social and cultural structures of power and depends on critical reflexivity.

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Penny Welch and Susan Wright

how two projects based on indirect cultural exchanges of food, stories and performances between humanities students, cultural organisations and local residents grew out of a dinner-table conversation between friends. These projects provided both a

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Thomas J. Eveland

Armbruster, Maya Patel, Erika Johnson, and Martha Weiss discuss findings that indicate improvement in student attitudes, performance and participation, and even increased morale and enthusiasm on the part of the instructor. More than just a summary of

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Sintayehu Kassaye Alemu

universities through the academic performance of the eight universities that form the Higher Education Research and Advocacy Network in Africa (HERANA). This book consists of twelve chapters, thirty-five figures, sixty tables and fifty-five acronyms and

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Minestrone Stories

Teaching anthropology through serendipitous cultural exchanges

Regnar Kristensen

instigate another series of cultural exchanges on top of this vegetable-song-soup series of exchanges. The interviews-narrative-performance series became the second part of the Minestrone Stories. As in the former exchanges, we encouraged the students

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Geoff Payne

contribute to its development, there is a second public policy reason for paying greater attention to satisfaction surveys. ‘Engagement’ became bound up in the higher education performance indicators system even before the recently introduced U.K. Teaching