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Adam Rounce

The Complete Poems of William Empson edited by John Haffenden (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 2000) ISBN 0713992875 £30.00

Norman Cameron: His Life, Work and Letters by Warren Hope (London: Greenwich Exchange, 2000) ISBN 187155105 6 £20.00

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Antony Rowland and Tadeusz Pióro

Tadeusz Borowski’s poetry is virtually unknown in Britain and America, despite the fact that the Polish writer was a poet long before he wrote his controversial stories about his experiences in Auschwitz–Birkenau and Dachau. These stories, a selection of which appear in Penguin’s This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen, ensured his canonical status in twentieth-century European literature. Yet only three Borowski poems are readily available in English translations: ‘Night over Birkenau’, ‘The Sun of Auschwitz’ and ‘Farewell to Maria’ are printed in Hilda Schiff’s anthology Holocaust Poetry. A few more appear in the English translation of Adam Zych’s anthology The Auschwitz Poems,3 but this edition is currently out of print.

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Hugh Underhill

Life as It Comes by Anthony Edkins (Bradford: Redbeck Press, 2002) ISBN 0946980969 £6.95

The Soldier on the Pier by Brian Waltham (Calstock: Peterloo Poets, 2002) ISBN 1871471990 £7.95

Craeft: Poems from the Anglo-Saxon by Graham Holderness (Nottingham: Shoestring Press, 2002) ISBN 1899549676 £7.50

The Great Friend and Other Translated Poems by Peter Robinson (Tonbridge: Worple Press, 2002) ISBN 095394774 £8

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‘Tu Numeris Elementa Ligas’

The Consolation of Nature’s Numbers in Parlement of Foulys

C.W.R.D. Moseley

More than once, Chaucer shows he is aware of his poems operating in two not necessarily convergent modes. Troilus and Criseyde (T&C ) often addresses the plural, listening audience presumed in ‘… Wherever thou art herde, or elles songe…’ (V. 1797

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‘Double Sorrow’

The Complexity of Complaint in Chaucer’s Anelida and Arcite and Henryson’s Testament of Cresseid

Jacqueline Tasioulas

Robert Henryson defines his Testament of Cresseid as a companion piece to Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde . The narrator tells us how, unable to sleep one cold spring night, he takes a copy of Chaucer’s poem from the shelf and reads the tale of

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Blanche, Two Chaucers and the Stanley Family

Rethinking the Reception of The Book of the Duchess

Simon Meecham-Jones

spurious) discourses and the accumulation of post-hoc speculation, wish fulfilment and error. None of Chaucer’s poems has suffered more grievously from such distracting obscuration than The Book of the Duchess (hereafter BD), but it is clear, also, that

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Elizabeth Mazzola

What meanes shall she out seeke, or what wayes take How shall she know, how shall she finde the man? —The Faerie Queene 3.3. 25.2–3 Catching himself looking away is a regular impulse in Spenser’s poems, recording the whereabouts of his gaze a habit

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George Dundas, Roger Craik, and John Lucas

Leros Summer 1939 GEORGE DUNDAS

Friday Night De Toog Eetcafe, Amsterdam ROGER CRAIK

Found Poem Thorn Gruin’s Sorrowful Sonnet JOHN LUCAS

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Christine Regan

Tony Harrison’s filial sonnets, from his major ongoing sonnet sequence The School of Eloquence (1978-), are widely regarded as among the most moving poems in the language, and have conversely been criticized for sentimentality. 1 Blake Morrison

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Matthew Zarnowiecki

different ways of presenting, or rather representing, this book. These choices inevitably accrue into an overall understanding of the poems, presented to the reader explicitly in the introduction or other accompanying text, and foisted onto the reader