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Tim Cresswell

A poem by Tim Cresswell

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Mohamed Assaf and Kate Clanchy

These poems were not, as their elegiac, melancholic tone seems to imply, written by a 60-something exile remembering his childhood, but by a small Syrian boy with a grubby collar and a large football, named Mohamed Assaf. He is not an easy child: he

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Contingency and Constraint

African-American Migration as Seen through Jacob Lawrence's “Migration” Series

Deborah Breen

Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) 11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019 http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2015/onewayticket/ Admission: USD 25/18/14 “I pick up my life, / And take it with me, / And I put it down in Chicago, Detroit, / Buff alo, Scranton, / Any place that is / North and East, / And not Dixie.” Th ese are the opening lines from “One-Way Ticket,” by African-American poet, Langston Hughes (1902–1967). Th e poem provides the emotional and historical core of the “Migration” paintings by Jacob Lawrence (1917–2000), a series that depicts the extraordinary internal migration of African Americans in the twentieth century. Not coincidentally, the poem also provides the title of the current exhibition of the sixty paintings in Lawrence’s series, on display at MoMA, New York, from 3 April to 7 September 2015.1 Shown together for the first time in over twenty years, the paintings are surrounded by works that provide context for the “great migration”: additional paintings by Lawrence, as well as paintings, drawings, photographs, texts, and musical recordings by other African-American artists, writers, and performers of the early to mid-twentieth century.

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“Behind the backs of houses”

Landscapes of Englishness in the Postwar Railway Poetry of John Betjeman and Philip Larkin

Heather Joyce

Railways in John Betjeman's and Philip Larkin's poems of the 1950s and 1960s function as provocative signifiers that interrogate and encourage definition of what constitutes the modern English landscape. Through their works, which recognize how railways have been held to register the cultural health of the nation from their inception, it becomes clear that the panoramic perception that railways make possible aptly represents the self-conscious cultural gaze filtered through crisis that critics argue prevails in the postwar context. Betjeman's and Larkin's speakers reveal the capacity for railway travel to disrupt the settled vision of nationhood at the heart of heritage-based Englishness; at the same time, railways – and they themselves – are not outside of this discourse. For Betjeman and, to a greater extent, Larkin, it is the possibility of double return embodied by the railway system that perhaps proffers a desirable mode of inhabiting the modern English nation.

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Chia-ling Lai

in Terezín, and his pupil pianist Alice Herz-Sommer. Nurse and poet Ilse Weber wrote sixty poems in Terezín, including the touching lullaby “Wiegala,” which she sang for Terezín children before they were sent to the gas chamber. Karel Švenk’s Theater

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Filmmaking at a Crossroads

Ulrike Ottinger’s Johanna d’Arc of Mongolia Goes off the Rails

Grace An

of experiences evoked by the Trans-Siberian, an important trope of exoticist literature depicting European encounters with the once Far East, including the poem it references directly, Blaise Cendrars’s “Prose du Transsibérien et de la petite Jeanne

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Maria Hupfield

jingle gloves, a set of seven black velvet circles, a silver Mylar survival blanket, a bag of candy, my signature wooden tokens, a “Manifest Destiny” T-shirt, and a bottle of water. The title is from a published poem by Quick-to-See Smith. Figure 3 Jingle

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Heidi Morrison, James S. Finley, Daniel Owen Spence, Aaron Hatley, Rachael Squire, Michael Ra-shon Hall, Stéphanie Vincent-Geslin, Sibo Chen, Tawny Andersen, and Stéphanie Ponsavady

produced what will surely be an essential reference for historians of mobility going forward. Wielding a polymathic range of primary sources from five countries alongside hundreds of novels, travelogues, poems, and films, Mom presents what he calls “a vista

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Lazy Labor, Modernization, and Coloniality

Mobile Cultures between the Andes and the Amazon around 1900

Jaime Moreno Tejada

tribute to the victims. Nationalist poems were read and calls were made to the progreso of Ecuador. More specifically, the Junta aimed to work, along with the central government, in the improvement of communications with the eastern lowlands. 33 The

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Alessandro Jedlowski

much African literature, from the classic poem by Aimé Césaire, Cahiers d’un retour au pays natal (Paris: Présence Africaine, 1956), to more recent examples, which include within the landscape of contemporary Nigerian literature, Chika Unigwe’s On