Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • Mobility Studies x
  • Anthropology x
  • All content x
Clear All
Free access

Mohamed Assaf and Kate Clanchy

These poems were not, as their elegiac, melancholic tone seems to imply, written by a 60-something exile remembering his childhood, but by a small Syrian boy with a grubby collar and a large football, named Mohamed Assaf. He is not an easy

Free access

Theophilus Kwek

All titles (in bold), and some lines in the poem are taken directly from the Flash Report of the OHCHR’s Mission to Bangladesh, ‘Interviews with Rohingyas Fleeing from Myanmar since 9 October 2016’, published on 3 February, 2017 and available

Restricted access

Eleni Philippou

Abstract

“Epitaphic” features two poems that were written to speak to the poet's interest in commemorating or capturing past moments, events, or persons. “Topographies” is concerned with the interplay between transience and permanence—the passing of time, changing relationships, but also the altering of emotional and physical landscapes. The poem largely speaks to a process of loss and memory, both on a macrocosmic or geographical level, and on a smaller, intimate level. Similarly, “Thanatos” connects with the broad theme of loss, particularly humanity's inability to recognize, appease, or ameliorate the suffering of the animal Other.

Free access

Mette Louise Berg, Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, and Johanna Waters

). The “Creative Encounters” section features poems by Eleni Philippou, reflecting on processes of “commemorating or capturing past moments, events, or persons.” This is followed by a series of book reviews on a variety of topics and themes pertaining to

Open access

Ben Page, Olga R. Gulina, Doğuş Şimşek, Caress Schenk, and Vidya Venkat

Bugeja, examines Hisham Matar's The Return: Fathers, Sons and the Land in Between , exploring the fate of IDPs from the perspective of the exile. Douglas Robinson's chapter looks at the agency in experiencing displacement through focusing on poems by

Free access

Refugee Hospitality Encounters in Northern Portugal

“Cultural Orientations” and “Contextual Protection”

Elizabeth Challinor

social protest poem, “The Peace Cantata,” by the 1999 Camões literature prize winner Sophia de Mello Breyner Andresen (1919–2004): “We see, we hear, we read. We cannot ignore.” 7 The poem, written for a vigil held in a Lisbon church on New Year’s Eve in