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Jess Dorrance

goes, how she is seen or used, and with whom she affiliates. In response, she blames herself. This article thinks with and about Boudry and Lorenz's film and accompanying installation Toxic in order to reflect upon the politics of racialized queer

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Sarah Kozloff

This article seeks to prompt a reevaluation of the efficacy of mainstream fiction films to convey liberalism's political and ethical values. First, it challenges still-influential Marxist claims about counter-cinema and distanciation, then it deplores the influence of contemporary irony and postmodernism. The article proceeds to enumerate the characteristics of “a cinema of engagement”; for example, moving us to empathy—even empathetic anger—rather than distancing us or making us feel superiority; manifesting a level gaze; analyzing structures of power; basing scripts on real events; employing both the realist and melodramatic modes; and inspiring viewers to work against social injustice. It invokes the theories of liberal philosophers, literary scholars, cognitive scientists, and psychologists, and draws supporting evidence from a close reading of The Insider (1999).

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Frank P. Tomasulo and Jason Grant McKahan

Although the extant scholarly literature on the cinema of the late Michelangelo Antonioni has often valorized his use of images and mise-en-scène to explore themes and reflections on humanism and alienation, few have examined the means by which the director conveyed ideas on psychology and sexuality in modern life and Italian culture. This article considers Antonioni's "trilogy"—L'avventura (The Adventure, 1959), La notte (Night, 1960), and L'eclisse (Eclipse, 1962)—in light of the modernist project, especially with regard to the conjuncture of psychology and sexuality within the historical context of the 1960s and the sexio-psychological discourses of that period. Finally, Antonioni's worldview is investigated, particularly as it pertains to his stated concept of malattia dei sentimenti, or "Sick Eros."

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Emma Celeste Bedor

of apathy, cynicism, and malaise as they relate to media exposure overwhelmingly examine these questions as they relate to political figures, their campaigns, and news coverage (Ansolabehere and Iyengar 1995 ; Bennett et al. 1999 ; Cappella and

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India Halstead

increasing skepticism to the political events following World War I. Conversely, movements such as Cubism and Abstract Expressionism were marked by an increased attention to formalism and abstraction and a resistance to art that was expressly political. 7

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Lowry Martin

important cultural commentary and serve as “public pedagogy and a form of cultural politics” (Giroux 2004: 122). Instead, these films offer alternative subject positions, they make visible and mobilize desires, they influence us unconsciously, and they help

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“The Dragon Can't Roar”

Analysis of British Expatriate Masculinity in Yusuf Dawood's One Life Too Many

Antony Mukasa Mate

main protagonist. Walker takes advantage of the British colonial domination and sojourns around several colonies under the Empire before settling in Kenya. There, Walker is immediately absorbed by the minority but economic and politically dominant

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Introduction

Visibility and Screen Politics after the Transgender Tipping Point

Wibke Straube

society, at the same time they have also been scrutinized with growing intensity. This visibility, as cultural scholar Eric Stanley (2017) argues, is a political instrument and far from only a liberating one. It brings with it the dangers of

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Esther Rashkin

What facilitates the psychic process of grieving a traumatic loss, and what happens when that process is blocked? Forbidden Games is, on one level, an intimate film about childhood trauma. When viewed from a psychoanalytic perspective informed by concepts such as introjection and pathological mourning, however, it emerges as a complex allegory that reflects, through its narrative and filmic elements, on the sociocultural and historical dynamics of France's troubled response to the loss of its identity as a democracy during World War II. The film also reflects on the even more shameful history of the rise of French anti-Semitism under the Vichy regime and France's history of silencing or repressing the drama of its willing collaboration with the Nazis' Final Solution. Private trauma thus screens public, political trauma as Clément's film becomes both a medium for sociocultural commentary and a memorial to loss that could not be buried or mourned.

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Sara Dickey

Much commentary on Indian cinema unreflectively equates film with fantasy. Writing in this vein may depict audiences as emotionally and cognitively undeveloped, while it represents those critics and viewers who prefer realism as sophisticated, rational, and mature. Those scholars of Indian cinema who examine fantasy and realism in depth, however, often draw different conclusions about both cinema and its consumers. Some note the close relationship between fantasy and reality, and thereby represent audiences as more savvy than do those who superficially link film with fantasy. Others analyze the privileging of cinematic realism as an element of socio-political ideology, or examine viewers' own application of realist criteria to films, thus further complicating the image of Indian cinema consumers as irrational and infantile. In continuing to pose these concepts as a dichotomy, however, cinema scholars reproduce some of the assumptions that underlie the standard usage in film criticism.