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Jess Dorrance

goes, how she is seen or used, and with whom she affiliates. In response, she blames herself. This article thinks with and about Boudry and Lorenz's film and accompanying installation Toxic in order to reflect upon the politics of racialized queer

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Buffeted by Political Winds

Children’s Literature in Communist Romania

Adrian Solomon

early 1960s; a “soft” phase with a more liberal, “human face” made possible by a change of course in politics, spanning the 1960s and the 1970s; and another reversal of the trend, this time toward national Communism, terminated by the 1989 uprising that

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Thatcher’s Sons?

1980s Boyhood in British Cinema, 2005–2010

Andy Pope

, represents the last bastion of traditional masculinity. These 1980s-set films 1 indicate that contemporary men have considerable difficulty reconciling the decade’s socio-political and cultural ambiguities. Films such as Is Anybody There? (2008) and The

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Emily Bent

Turkey. The 2019 GSO underscored girls’ political leadership on addressing contemporary human rights issues including climate change, immigration and forced migration, Indigenous rights, gender equality in schools, menstrual equity, and gender

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Sakai Magara

Activist Girl of Early Twentieth Century Japan

Barbara Hartley

women from joining political entities and from holding or even attending political meetings. Magara notes that had the women involved been able to participate legitimately in the Japan League of Socialists formed in 1920, the Red Wave Society may never

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Hopeful, Harmless, and Heroic

Figuring the Girl Activist as Global Savior

Jessica K. Taft

rarely considered and written about as significant political actors. They appear, but they do not speak” ( Taft 2011: 5 ). Girl activists were “not the kind of empowered girls usually celebrated by the media” (25). At that time, these were easily

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Jasmyn Galley

analogous to the cultural, political, and social oppression of Aboriginal Peoples throughout history at the hands of colonialists as well as at those of contemporary Canadians. I will discuss how Highway’s play also implies hopeful potential for change in

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Elina Oinas

In this article I explore the concept of the rebellious girl by examining the cases of three different girls: an HIV activist in South Africa; a young feminist in Finland; and a topless on-line protester in post-revolution Tunisia. Although their contexts and messages vary greatly, there are marked similarities between and amongst them. I suggest that, in general, the media, political movements, and research agendas often appear to have difficulty taking girls' protests seriously. The rebellious girl is ridiculed, shunned, shamed, and disciplined. The protests explored here can, however, be read as important visual interruptions that attempt to invoke an epistemic mutiny that does not beg for inclusion on preexisting terms but, rather, challenges the boundaries of acceptable bodily integrity. They also gesture towards the social in a way that demands recognition, acceptance, and support, not a simplified acceptance based on the notion of neoliberal individual freedom.

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Girlhood in Action

Contemporary U.S. Girls’ Organizations and the Public Sphere

Jessica K. Taft

This article addresses the growing concern with youth civic engagement by asking how contemporary U.S. girls' organizations envision girls' civic identities. Recent years have seen the growth of girls' organizations that aim to involve girls in their communities. Based on extensive document research and two ethnographic case studies, my analysis distinguishes between this emergent transformative approach and a more widespread, normative model. Transformative organizations engage girls in a sociological analysis of the conditions of their lives, believe that girls should have public authority, and encourage girls' involvement in social change projects. Normative organizations rely upon a psychological understanding of girls' problems, imagine the public as a space of threat and as being full of barriers girls that must learn to overcome, and emphasize service over political action. By comparing these two approaches, this article suggests that scholars and practitioners should carefully consider the implications of organizations for girls' relationship to the public sphere.

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Caroline Caron

This article addresses the invisibility of teenage girls within and outside of feminist theory and citizenship studies from the perspective of girlhood studies. Most often addressed as individuals in need of protection, girls and adolescent females are seldom considered political citizen-subjects. In addition, because they do not fit within existing frameworks of analysis, some of their citizenship practices, including mediamaking, are not acknowledged as forms of political agentivity or political participation. Drawing on my past and current research with Francophone teenage girls in Canada, I highlight and problematize this denial in a way that underlines the need for girlhood studies to politicize its vocabulary so that teenage girls can become part of us rather than women-to-become in feminist citizenship studies and others areas of inquiry in which youth citizenship is being re-theorized. I argue that such politicization broadens what girls' health entails to include their political healthiness.