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Buffeted by Political Winds

Children’s Literature in Communist Romania

Adrian Solomon

early 1960s; a “soft” phase with a more liberal, “human face” made possible by a change of course in politics, spanning the 1960s and the 1970s; and another reversal of the trend, this time toward national Communism, terminated by the 1989 uprising that

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Thatcher’s Sons?

1980s Boyhood in British Cinema, 2005–2010

Andy Pope

, represents the last bastion of traditional masculinity. These 1980s-set films 1 indicate that contemporary men have considerable difficulty reconciling the decade’s socio-political and cultural ambiguities. Films such as Is Anybody There? (2008) and The

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Jess Dorrance

goes, how she is seen or used, and with whom she affiliates. In response, she blames herself. This article thinks with and about Boudry and Lorenz's film and accompanying installation Toxic in order to reflect upon the politics of racialized queer

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Emma Celeste Bedor

of apathy, cynicism, and malaise as they relate to media exposure overwhelmingly examine these questions as they relate to political figures, their campaigns, and news coverage (Ansolabehere and Iyengar 1995 ; Bennett et al. 1999 ; Cappella and

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Lowry Martin

important cultural commentary and serve as “public pedagogy and a form of cultural politics” (Giroux 2004: 122). Instead, these films offer alternative subject positions, they make visible and mobilize desires, they influence us unconsciously, and they help

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India Halstead

increasing skepticism to the political events following World War I. Conversely, movements such as Cubism and Abstract Expressionism were marked by an increased attention to formalism and abstraction and a resistance to art that was expressly political. 7

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“I Am Trying” to Perform Like an Ideal Boy

The Construction of Boyhood through Corporal Punishment and Educational Discipline in Taare Zameen Par

Natasha Anand

that on the one hand, reflects how dominant social, cultural, and political dogmas restrict gendered identities, yet on the other, acts also as a site of struggle, resistance and contest effectively reshaping, transforming and empowering such

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“The Dragon Can't Roar”

Analysis of British Expatriate Masculinity in Yusuf Dawood's One Life Too Many

Antony Mukasa Mate

main protagonist. Walker takes advantage of the British colonial domination and sojourns around several colonies under the Empire before settling in Kenya. There, Walker is immediately absorbed by the minority but economic and politically dominant

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Jonathan A. Allan

Crises of masculinity and wars on boys often deploy the suicides of young males as a rhetorical strategy in raising awareness for a political cause, that is to say a declaration of war, a war that remains dubious at best. Who, for instance, declared “war” on “boys”? This paper argues that theorists of gender, particularly masculinity, must think carefully and critically about suicide as a rhetorical strategy. In particular, this paper seeks to explain why men’s rights activists and scholars prefer the term “boys” to “young men” or “adolescents,” and subsequently aims to work through ideas of temporality, futurity, and slow death to understand the deployment of suicide as strategy.

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Anne Markey

This article explores the construction of boyhood in short fiction written by Patrick Pearse, the Irish nationalist and political activist executed for his leading role in the abortive Easter Rising of 1916. Pearse’s focus on the spiritual dimension of boyhood in his first collection of Irish-language stories, Íosagán agus Sgéalta Eile [Iosagan and Other Stories] (1907), simultaneously undermines and endorses imperialist and patriarchal assumptions about gender differentiation. In later stories published in An Mháthair agus sgéalta eile [The Mother and Other Stories] (1916), Pearse moved from advocacy of boyish spirituality to a more physical and militant representation of boyhood. This changing representation of Irish boyhood illustrates how Pearse’s increasing militarism reflected his ongoing construction of national identity.