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Robert Leroux

Abstract

It is well known that Durkheim was a major source of influence in most of Boudon's writings. But his vision of Durkheim has evolved a lot over the years. In the 1960s until the 1990s, he presented Durkheim as a positivist, fairly close to Auguste Comte, and he considered The Rules of the Sociological Method as a mediating work which announced all of the Durkheim's thought. In his most recent works, Boudon brings an original perspective that Durkheim was an important theorist of rationality.

Résumé

Boudon a développé une admiration durable pour Durkheim dont il ne s'est jamais départi. Durkheim n'a jamais cessé en effet d'être pour lui un inspirateur, mais la lecture qu'il en fait a néanmoins évolué au fil du temps. Des années 1960 aux années 1990 il le présente comme un auteur positiviste dont il admire la réflexion sur la scientificité de la sociologie. Après 1990 il le présente comme un précurseur malgré lui de l'individualisme méthodologique, et traduit sa sociologie dans le langage de la théorie de l'action.

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Assumptions matter

Reflections on the Kanbur typology

Paul Shaffer

In contradistinction to Ravi Kanbur's (2003) summarization of a recent conference on qualitative and quantitative poverty analysis in which he proposed a typology of differences between 'qual and quant' approaches, I argue that key elements in this typology are derivative of more basic distinctions in the philosophy of social science between three research programs: empiricism/positivism, hermeneutics, and critical theory/critical hermeneutics. The point is not simply of academic interest but has practical implications for aspects of poverty analysis, including numeric transformation of data, assessment of the validity of empirical findings, and inferring policy implications from research results.

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A Theory of ‘Animal Borders’

Thoughts and Practices toward Non-human Animals among the G|ui Hunter-Gatherers

Kazuyoshi Sugawara

locate my theoretical standpoint in the ‘phenomenological positivism’ proposed by Maurice Merleau-Ponty and explicate the dual meaning of the term ‘animal border’. I then offer a general description of the subjects of my ethnographic research, G

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Shelling from the ivory tower

Project Camelot and the post–World War II operationalization of social science

Philip Y. Kao

how and why certain scientific ideas and values were employed to study social change. It will expand on the connection between positivism and functionalism in Project Camelot’s design, and show how this linkage eventually played out in the early

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Konstantin Klokov

environment and patterns of reindeer herding. Scholars have emphasized the difference of these modes of thinking. The dominant approach is based on positivism and is a kind of “a machine theory” with the help of which a computer model may be built ( Dudgeon

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Maureen Mulligan

, “Imagination and memory are motivating forces behind O’Brien’s travel writing and not the linear, chronological positivism of the didactic travel text” (1993: 141). It is difficult to know if her work had an impact in Spain. According to Reynolds, Farewell

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Sensing evil

Counterterrorism, techno-science, and the cultural reproduction of security

Mark Maguire and Pete Fussey

as basic emotional states, deception cues, and, potentially, emotional signs of hostile intent. Today, in a re-imagining of centuries-old criminological positivism, the techno-scientific projects emerging from homeland security include AVATAR

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What Is Analysis?

Between Theory, Ethnography, and Method

Martin Holbraad, Sarah Green, Alberto Corsín Jiménez, Veena Das, Nurit Bird-David, Eduardo Kohn, Ghassan Hage, Laura Bear, Hannah Knox, and Bruce Kapferer

then, in scientific positivism. Anthropology in much of its finest work did not start from theory but moved toward it (see Kapferer 2007 ). Kroeber and Evans-Pritchard understood the crucial distinction of anthropology born of its externalization of

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Joost Beuving and Geert de Vries

sociology and psychology in particular) and later in semi-independent methodology departments. The first generation of chairs in social research methodology almost without exception embraced positivism as their guiding paradigm. Typically, they espoused

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Teaching internationalisation?

Surveying the lack of pedagogical and theoretical diversity in American International Relations

Christopher R. Cook

. (2011: 437) argue ‘realist [as a specific school] research never made up more than 15 per cent of published articles in any time period’. They argue that while most articles ‘are non-paradigmatic’ the journals still favoured rationalism, positivism and