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The Artist in a Positivist Academy

Bridging the Artist-Scholar Divide

Ibanga B. Ikpe

, contemporary hyper-positivist philosophy could be cited as its intellectual foundation. Hyper-positivism, with the natural sciences as its model, has as its ‘ontological assumption that the world is orderly, lawful and therefore predictable’ ( Williams 2015: 24

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Political Theory and Political Science

Can This Marriage Be Saved?

Terence Ball

The too-often unhappy 'marriage' of political theory and political science has long been a source of anguish for both partners. Should this troubled partnership be dissolved? Or might this marriage yet be saved? Ball answers the former question negatively and the latter affirmatively. Playing the part of therapist instead of theorist, he selectively recounts a number of episodes which estranged the partners and strained the marriage. And yet, he concludes that the conflicts were in hindsight more constructive than destructive, benefiting both partners in heretofore unexpected ways and perhaps paving a path toward reconciliation and rapprochement.

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Conservative Crossings

Bernard Faÿ and the Rise of American Studies in Third-Republic France

John L. Harvey

Perhaps no other French historian led such a sordid academic career as that of Bernard Faÿ, who held the first European chair in American history at the Collège de France from 1932 to his removal in 1944. Celebrated as the leading interwar specialist on America, Faÿ was a steadfast ally of the Catholic political Right. His conservatism, however, never threatened his international stature or his domestic academic standing until 1940, after which he led the Vichy regime's assault on Freemasonry. He succeeded as a historian by employing research on the United States to reject traditions of popular sovereignty, while also embracing new methodological trends that critiqued scientific positivism, often as an attack on the intellectual foundation of the Third Republic. His legacy suggests how the conceptual legitimacy of secular, egalitarian society could be contested through the very ideas that "cosmopolitan modernity" had sought to support.

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Stefan Nygård and Johan Strang

, was comparing different interpretations of positivism and liberalism in England, Germany, France, and southern Europe in the interest of finding a suitable model for his native Denmark and Scandinavia. As a cultural mediator outside the core, Brandes

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Monika Rudaś-Grodzka, Katarzyna Nadana-Sokołowska, Anna Borgos, and Dorottya Rédai

various historical periods (Joanna Partyka—early modernity, Monika Rudaś-Grodzka—romanticism, Iwona Wiśniewska—second half of the nineteenth century or so-called “positivism,” Anna Nasiłowska—modernism); in various genres and aspects of women’s writing

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Eugenia Gay, Philipp Nielsen, Emanuel Richter, and Gregor Feindt

. Turnaoğlu proceeds to tease them out in chapters 4 and 5 under the Young Turks up to and after the 1908 Revolution (emphasizing the liberal strand, influenced by French positivism), in chapters 6 and 7 during the Balkan Wars and World War I (where she sees a

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Crisis? How Is That a Crisis!?

Reflections on an Overburdened Word

Michael Freeden

“tension” or “strain” would do equally. 28 Habermas, to the contrary, offers a highly systematic analysis of crisis that is distinguished from Lipset’s positivism by giving it, as Habermas puts it, a tacit normative meaning—as indeed do Marxists

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Clarifying Liquidity

Keynes and Marx, Merchants, and Poets

Rolf Hugoson

indirectly “dynamic” mechanical theory of progress. On the other hand, Giddens has revealed Comte's impact on Mach's methodological considerations: See Anthony Giddens, “Positivism and its Critics,” in A History of Sociological Analysis , ed. Tom Bottomore

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Dhan Zunino Singh

-century intellectuals and political leaders who pursued the values of “progress” and “civilization,” guided by principles ranging from liberalism, utilitarianism, enlightenment, and romanticism to positivism and epitomized by the dichotomy between “civilization” and

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A Negative Theory of Justice

Towards a Critical Theory of Power Relations

Leonard Mazzone

these notions have been traditionally related, thought of, and recognised. Instead of conceiving of injustice in a derivative way as the transgression of some legal norm (legal positivism) or ideal principles of justice (ideal theories of justice