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Robert Leroux

Abstract

It is well known that Durkheim was a major source of influence in most of Boudon's writings. But his vision of Durkheim has evolved a lot over the years. In the 1960s until the 1990s, he presented Durkheim as a positivist, fairly close to Auguste Comte, and he considered The Rules of the Sociological Method as a mediating work which announced all of the Durkheim's thought. In his most recent works, Boudon brings an original perspective that Durkheim was an important theorist of rationality.

Résumé

Boudon a développé une admiration durable pour Durkheim dont il ne s'est jamais départi. Durkheim n'a jamais cessé en effet d'être pour lui un inspirateur, mais la lecture qu'il en fait a néanmoins évolué au fil du temps. Des années 1960 aux années 1990 il le présente comme un auteur positiviste dont il admire la réflexion sur la scientificité de la sociologie. Après 1990 il le présente comme un précurseur malgré lui de l'individualisme méthodologique, et traduit sa sociologie dans le langage de la théorie de l'action.

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Jaap Westbroek, Harry Nijhuis, and Laurent van der Maesen

phenomena, Comte's positivism is not identical with radical empiricism or with the positivism of the Vienna Circle. As Martindale observed: “In fusing organicism to [his form of] positivism, sociology proposed to convert the empiricist-positivistic tradition

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Peter Herrmann

. Boston : University of Massachusetts Press . Hart , H. L. A. 1958 . “ Positivism and the Separation of Law and Morals .” Harvard Law Review 71 ( 4 ): 593 – 629 . http://www.jstor.org/stable/1338225 10.2307/1338225 Jhering , R. von

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The Socio-analytical Approach

Differences in International Scientific Discourses

Rolf-Dieter Hepp

the flavor of the month dressed with a soupcon of “French radical chic” to the age-old irratioalistic rejection of science, and more especially of social science, under the aegis of a denunciation of “positivism” and “scientism,” this sort of

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Matthew C. Eshleman, Eric Hamm, Curtis Sommerlatte, Adrian van den Hoven, Michael Lejman, and Diane Perpich

commentary on history came as part of broader attacks on positivism as a product, the hegemonic class’s invention of tradition or generalization of a biased narrative—in particular, this is a view of German historicism which Sartre would later employ to