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Video Surveillance in Portugal

Political Rhetoric at the Center of a Technological Project

Catarina Frois

This article gives a detailed account of the political processes and stages involved in the implementation of video surveillance devices in two major Portuguese cities, Oporto and Lisbon. It seeks to draw two main conclusions regarding the introduction of these systems in public areas and the developments that they have undergone over the period under analysis. The first is that installing these devices reflects a political response designed to provide a hasty solution to a social phenomenon—fear—that is largely subjective. The second is that the generalized perception as to the uncertainty of the effectiveness of these systems explains the lack of consistency and coordination in their implementation. The article concludes by discussing fear and insecurity in the context of concerns for a more efficient justice system.

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Introduction

Why Revisit Intimacy?

Sertaç Sehlikoglu and Aslı Zengin

Intimacy is tightly bound up with notions of privacy, sexuality, proximity and secrecy, and with dynamics of sensual and affective attachments and forms of desire. It is therefore integral to the formation of human selves and subjectivities, as well as communities, publics, collectives and socialities. The articles in this Special Section all offer an anthropological inquiry into intimacy, seeking a conceptual formulation that might capture its actual operations, the ways intimacy is done in talk and action. They thus contribute ethnographically to ongoing anthropological debates about intimacy, and explore how multiple domains and forms of intimacies are defined, shaped, constructed and transformed across different social worlds.

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Intimate Publics, Public Intimacies

Natural Limits, Creation and the Culture of Mahremiyet in Turkey

Sertaç Sehlikoglu

This article offers an ethnographic account of the culture of mahremiyet [intimacy and privacy] in Turkey, not only as an institution of intimacy regulating everyday sexual relationships between individuals in public, but also as a system enabling the operation of social normalcies through the creation of boundaries and privileges. By probing the concepts of mahremiyet and fıtrat [creation or natural disposition], the article investigates how intimacy operates in religious, mundane and political registers, and delves into the intricate relationship between the intimate and the shared. It suggests that the culture of mahremiyet is deeply rooted in the ways individuals construct their sense of selves in relation to others, and imagine mahrem boundaries as natural, God-given, or fıtrî laws in their entanglement with gender. The use of the language of mahremiyet in contemporary politics not only enables what can seem to be a meta-cultural intelligibility that guarantees popular support, but also distances any critique as strange or foreign.

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“We Do Not Exist”

Illness, Invisibility, and Empowerment of Communities Struck by the Fracking Boom

Kristen M. Schorpp

of legal and privacy issues that influenced design choices. A substantial portion of the book is a “how-to” for developing and implementing online tools for communities faced with environmental hazards, while simultaneously acknowledging the

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Learning the Elsewhere of ‘Inner Space’

The Affective Pedagogy of Post-Secular Sufi Healing in Germany

Nasima Selim

environments engender “the body fragmented in affect … in evaluations they deeply disturb any pretense of privacy of the body that teaches or learns” ( Probyn 2004: 38) . Shifting the conceptual vocabulary of affective pedagogy from the institutional settings

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Love is Love

The Recent Jason Jones Judgement in Trinidad and Tobago

Dylan Kerrigan

’s fundamental human rights ranging from family life and privacy to freedom of thought and expression. The government of T&T has appealed the judgement to the UK-based Privy Council for a final ruling. As Attorney General Faris Al-Rawi noted at the time, ‘The

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The Limits of Knowing Other Minds

Intellectual Disability and the Challenge of Opacity

Patrick McKearney

because Joel Robbins (2008: 426) describes them as holding a severe “opacity doctrine” that forbids all talk of another's interior states as a serious violation of that person's dignity and privacy (see also Robbins and Rumsey 2008: 416 ). Robbins (n

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Introduction

Nonrecording states between legibility and looking away

Barak Kalir and Willem van Schendel

the protection of surplus populations . Antipode 41 ( 1 ): 66 – 93 . 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00717.x Lyon , David , ed. 2003 . Surveillance as social sorting: Privacy, risk, and digital discrimination . New York : Routledge . Nyers , Peter

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Following, Othering, Taking Over

Research Participants Redefining the Field through Mobile Communication Technology

Nanneke Winters

living in terrible conditions. If they can fetch me to even take me back to Congo it's fine but I can't stay here. The sense of isolation and the lack of proper sanitation, drinking water, safety, privacy, and freedom of movement made Stella feel

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Digital and Offline

Partial Fields and Knowledge Producers

Narmala Halstead

and privacy concerns differ from the fieldwork diligence and online and offline curating of relations in the accounts of Liana Chua and of Nanneke Winters. Also, despite having been active in dangerous field sites, Jason Scott relates how he dealt with