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Understanding Agency: Social Theory and Responsible Action, by Barry Barnes. London: Sage Publications, 2000. Reviewed by Christine MacDonald

Rationality and Power: Democracy in Practice, by Bent Flyvbjerg. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998. Reviewed by Roger Deacon

Is Data Human? The Metaphysics of Star Trek, by Richard Hanley. Basic Books, 1997. Reviewed by Deane Baker

The Skeptical Environmentalist, by Bjorn Lomborg. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Reviewed by Julia de Kadt

Edward Said and the Writing of History, by Shelley Walia. Icon/Totem Books, 2001. Edward Said: A Critical Introduction, by Valerie Kennedy. Cambridge: Polity, 2000. The Edward Said Reader, edited by Moustafa Bayoumi, Andrew Rubin and Edward Said. Vintage Books, 2000. Reviewed by Derek Hook

Lenin: A Biography, by Robert Service. London: Macmillan, 2000. Reviewed by Derek Hook

Citizenship and Democracy in a Global Era, edited by Andrew Vandenberg. Macmillan and St Martin’s Press, 2000. Reviewed by Kirsten Trotter

Democracy as Public Deliberation: New Perspectives, edited by Maurizio Passerin d’Entrèves. Perspectives on Democratisation Series. Manchester University Press: Manchester and New York, 2002. Reviewed by Laurence Piper

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Deliberation and Courts

The Role of the Judiciary in a Deliberative System

Donald Bello Hutt

(1987: 359), and Cohen defined deliberative democracy as ‘an association whose affairs are governed by the public deliberation of its members’ (1997: 67). For Bohman, during early formulations of the theory ‘deliberation was always opposed to aggregation

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Daryl Glaser

the occasion to rally public support of the student cause. There was little by way of public deliberation. The assembly’s failure persuaded the VC to reopen the university without the agreement of the student militants, and behind a shield of private

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Bertjan Wolthuis

are not simply a fixed outcome of their existing private or non-political interests’ (Rawls 1999a: 138–139) . This learning element in public deliberation implies that one cannot simply draw the conclusion that there is no duty to use public reason