Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 89 items for :

  • Media Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Queer Sinofuturism

The Aberrant Movements and Posthumanist Mutations of Body, Identity, and Matter in Lu Yang's Uterus Man

Gabriel Remy-Handfield

inherent queerness present in the video; indeterminacy is already implied in the title of the film. The character possesses different abilities and weapons, all related to a different part of the uterus associated with the feminine body . Lu Yang created a

Restricted access

Redefining Representation

Black Trans and Queer Women’s Digital Media Production

Moya Bailey

creation of a touchstone for other trans women of color on their own journeys, and the healing that came through the process of writing her book. Mock’s narration of her own story marks a practice of Black queer and trans women’s media production that can

Restricted access

Close to You

Karen Carpenter and the Body-Martyr in Queer Memory

Julian Binder

” and mundane image, the Carpenters have left a legacy that has endured and been subject to constructions of memory and reproduction in unlikely, queer places—and this is especially true of the Karen Carpenter legacy in the years following her death in

Free access

Who (the) Girls and Boys Are

Gender Nonconformity in Middle-Grade Fiction

Michele Byers

, as they mirror for us their potential futures in the present. These characters exist in queer temporalities in which their futures are imagined “according to logics that lie outside [of] those paradigmatic markers of life experience” ( Halberstam 2005

Restricted access

Queer Girlhoods in Contemporary Comics

Disrupting Normative Notions

Mel Gibson

Introduction “What in the Joan Jett are you Doing?!” ( Stevenson et al. 2016: 3 ) In focusing on the representations of queer girlhoods in contemporary fictional graphic novels for young readers, I look at two ongoing series, Lumberjanes (2015

Free access

Queering Virginity

From Unruly Girls to Effeminate Boys

Eftihia Mihelakis

collection of eight essays that seeks to offer a non-linear and queer approach to understanding virginity in literature and popular culture. This volume openly challenges the perceived monopoly of the hymen as the sole signifier of virginity, proposing

Restricted access

Jess Dorrance

goes, how she is seen or used, and with whom she affiliates. In response, she blames herself. This article thinks with and about Boudry and Lorenz's film and accompanying installation Toxic in order to reflect upon the politics of racialized queer

Restricted access

Non-normative Bodies, Queer Identities

Marginalizing Queer Girls in YA Dystopian Literature

Miranda A. Green-Barteet and Jill Coste

In this article we consider the absence of queer female protagonists in dystopian Young Adult (YA) fiction and examine how texts with queer protagonists rely on heteronormative frameworks. Often seen as progressive, dystopian YA fiction features rebellious teen girls resisting the restrictive norms of their societies, but it frequently sidelines queerness in favor of heteronormative romance for its predominantly white, able-bodied protagonists. We analyze The Scorpion Rules (2015) and Love in the Time of Global Warming (2013), both of which feature queer girl protagonists, and conclude that these texts ultimately marginalize that queerness. While they offer readers queer female protagonists, they also equate queerness with non-normative bodies and reaffirm heteronormativity. The rebellion of both protagonists effectively distances them from the queer agency they have developed throughout the narratives.

Restricted access

Crossdressing Dansō

Negotiating between Stereotypical Femininity and Self-expression in Patriarchal Japan

Marta Fanasca

In this article, I focus on the childhood and adolescent life experiences of dansō (female-to-male crossdressers) who work as escorts in contemporary Japan, and on the process that led to their presentation of self as gendered masculine in their private and working lives. During their childhood and adolescence, dansō have to negotiate their identity and self-presentation to adhere to the gendered pressures of Japanese society. Through an analysis of interviews undertaken with 14 dansō informants, I explore dansō’s construction of a male identity before adulthood, highlighting the societal impositions they experienced and the coping strategies to which they resorted in order to create and maintain a space in which to express their queer selves.

Restricted access

Allison Macleod

As I enter the Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA) in Glasgow for the opening night of the Scottish Queer International Film Festival (SQIFF), two giant pink poodles (actually festival volunteers dressed as characters from the festival