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Introduction

Repatriation and Ritual, Repatriation as Ritual

Laura Peers, Lotten Gustafsson Reinius, and Jennifer Shannon

survival. The editors and authors of this special section of Museum Worlds have taken a different set of perspectives. We explore repatriation as ritual: a set of highlighted performances enacting cosmological beliefs for a special purpose, deeply

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Helen A. Robbins and Leigh Kuwanwisiwma

While repatriation legislation in the United States was always intended to be restorative, the highly ritualized, bureaucratic processes involved often serve to reinscribe the very power structures they are, in theory, designed to remedy. This

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The Ritual Labor of Reconciliation

An Autoethnography of a Return of Human Remains

Lotten Gustafsson Reinius

the didgeridoo. Then it was time to go through the smoke. Theoretical and Curatorial Perspectives Rituals of repatriation involve transformations of institutions, objects, and relations. In this article, I discuss the ceremonies involved in the

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Sonya Atalay, Nika Collison Jisgang, Te Herekiekie Herewini, Eric Hollinger, Michelle Horwood, Robert W. Preucel, Anthony Shelton, and Paul Tapsell

Edited by Jennifer Shannon

authors below attest to, transformative work for all who are involved, whether they are from a museum, Indigenous community, or both. Sonya Atalay (Anishinaabe—Ojibwe) University of Massachusetts Amherst Repatriation is healing. Rituals of repatriation

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The Magic of Bureaucracy

Repatriation as Ceremony

Laura Peers

-mail, by publication of decisions, by letter, through formal minuted committee meetings, and by carefully planned face-to-face visits; it follows institutional policy and cultural protocol. Such actions are performed carefully, formally—ritually. While the

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Unpacking the Museum Register

Institutional Memories of the Potlatch Collection Repatriation

Emma Knight

Society 1975 ; Sanborn 2009 ; Saunders 1995 ; 1997 ; Webster 1988 , 1991 , 1992 , 1995 ). My contribution seeks to place this case within a discussion of administrative repatriation rituals. Terence Turner (1977: 61–62) defines ritual as

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German Displaced Persons Camps (1945-1948)

Orthodox Jewish Responses to the Holocaust

Gershon Greenberg

Orthodox Jews in postwar German Displaced Persons camps experienced the Holocaust's rupture of God's covenantal relationship with history and the eclipse of sacred reality. They sought to recapture that reality, even though the continuity of tradition that held it had been shattered. This was done by voluntarily reviving tradition, as if by doing so the sacred could be invoked. Following momentary suspension, they sought to restore ethnic-generational purity and traditional ritual. They invested holiday celebration with Holocaust meaning. On the level of thought they expanded Israel's metahistory to include the unprecedented tragedy and intensified their own contributions of Torah and Teshuvah to the higher drama, and recommitted their trust that divine light was implicit to reality's darkness.

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The Three Burials of Aslak Hætta and Mons Somby

Repatriation Narratives and Ritual Performances

Stein R. Mathisen

Introduction: History, Ethnic Conflicts, the Dead, and Their Remains The historical backdrop for the events, narratives, and ritual ceremonies discussed in this article is the Kautokeino rebellion of 1852, leading to the death sentence and

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The Conceptual and Anthropological History of Bat Mitzvah

Two Lexical Paths and Two Jewish Identities

Hizky Shoham

. 1 Conceptual history aims to historicize the semantic fields of key concepts in society in light of the linguistic turn and semiotics. 2 Although anthropological themes such as rituals are a central element in the world of human beings, one that is

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The Different Faces of a Celebration

The Greek Course of International Women's Day, 1924–2010

Angelika Psarra

This article examines the history of International Women's Day (IWD) in Greece from its first celebration in 1924 until 2010. IWD was introduced in Greece by the KKE (Communist Party of Greece) and remained a communist ritual for fifty years. After the fall of the military dictatorship in 1974, the anniversary gradually acquired a wide acceptance and has since been adopted by feminist groups and organizations, trade unions, and parties from the entire political spectrum. The article follows the transformations of the celebration, explores its nebulous genealogy and the myths about its origins, and discusses its impressive ability to survive in diverse socio-political contexts.