Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 72 items for :

  • Anthropology x
  • Cultural Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Sonya Atalay, Nika Collison Jisgang, Te Herekiekie Herewini, Eric Hollinger, Michelle Horwood, Robert W. Preucel, Anthony Shelton, and Paul Tapsell

Edited by Jennifer Shannon

authors below attest to, transformative work for all who are involved, whether they are from a museum, Indigenous community, or both. Sonya Atalay (Anishinaabe—Ojibwe) University of Massachusetts Amherst Repatriation is healing. Rituals of repatriation

Restricted access

The Ritual Labor of Reconciliation

An Autoethnography of a Return of Human Remains

Lotten Gustafsson Reinius

the didgeridoo. Then it was time to go through the smoke. Theoretical and Curatorial Perspectives Rituals of repatriation involve transformations of institutions, objects, and relations. In this article, I discuss the ceremonies involved in the

Restricted access

Helen A. Robbins and Leigh Kuwanwisiwma

While repatriation legislation in the United States was always intended to be restorative, the highly ritualized, bureaucratic processes involved often serve to reinscribe the very power structures they are, in theory, designed to remedy. This

Restricted access

Negotiating between Shi’a and Catholic Rituals in Iran

A Case Study of Filipina Converts and Their Adult Children

Ashraf Zahedi

Religious rituals, while comforting for believers, may be uncomfortable for those who do not share their manifold meanings. Catholic Filipinas who marry Muslim Iranian men face mandatory conversion to Islam, necessitating ongoing negotiations between Christianity and Islam. My research suggests that these Filipinas held their first religion dear while participating in – for them – unpleasant Shi’a Muslims rituals. Their Filipino/Iranian children, familiar from birth with Shi’a Islam, felt at home with both religions, no matter which one they chose for themselves. The discussion of converts’ perceptions of Shi’a rituals contributes to the literature on transnational marriages and marriage migration.

Restricted access

Aidarbek Kochkunov

This article analyses one of the most important components of Kyrgyz culture - the tradition and ritual of hospitality. Features of traditional and modern hospitality are examined on the basis of literary sources and the author's fieldwork. The hospitality ritual and the norms associated with guests are discussed first in their traditional and then in their modern aspects. The author argues that ethnic specificities have been maintained on a large scale. Gender and age in the organisation of meals, as well as the prestige of meat dishes, continue to have traditional character, and the importance of hospitality has been imparted to younger generations. The author concludes that the interaction of innovations and traditions constitute the main content, development and present characteristics of Kyrgyz customs and hospitality rituals.

Free access

Introduction

Repatriation and Ritual, Repatriation as Ritual

Laura Peers, Lotten Gustafsson Reinius, and Jennifer Shannon

survival. The editors and authors of this special section of Museum Worlds have taken a different set of perspectives. We explore repatriation as ritual: a set of highlighted performances enacting cosmological beliefs for a special purpose, deeply

Restricted access

Aestheticised Rituals and (Non-)Engagement with Norms in Contemporary Turkey

A Contribution to Discussions on Piety and Ethics

Erol Saglam

Drawing on an ethnographic research in some rural communities of Trabzon, Turkey, this article provides insights about the diversity of Islamic pieties and their relations to religious norms. An exploration of everyday Islamic practices in the area demonstrates how piety can take peculiar forms within which norms are both publicly and socially upheld and yet also hollowed out. Among Muslim men of ‘the Valley’ in Trabzon, piety emerges as an aggregate of reiterative practices exterior to the pious self. Highlighting the aestheticised and ritualised state of these engagements with Islam in the Turkish context allows discussion of the relationships among practices of piety, pious subjectivities, and ethics.

Restricted access

Blood and the City

Animal Representations and Urban (Dis)orders during the ‘Feast of the Sacrifice’ in Istanbul and Khartoum

Alice Franck, Jean Gardin, and Olivier Givre

cultural and religious contexts. A kind of universal ritual item for anthropologists ( Cartry 2002: 643 ), it has nonetheless been interpreted in such various manners that any assumption of a common sacrificial model (from Mauss and Hubert to Girard) is

Restricted access

The Magic of Bureaucracy

Repatriation as Ceremony

Laura Peers

-mail, by publication of decisions, by letter, through formal minuted committee meetings, and by carefully planned face-to-face visits; it follows institutional policy and cultural protocol. Such actions are performed carefully, formally—ritually. While the

Restricted access

A Purging Presence

The Dog in Zoroastrian Tradition

Mahnaz Moazami

obnoxious in certain aspects. Death in Zoroastrianism In Zoroastrian religion the body in its pristine state is pure, unless and until by some means it later becomes ritually polluted. But once it dies, Nasu- (Av. nasao- f., nasuš- n.; MPers. nas