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Guido Thiemeyer

This article focuses on the economic aspects of German European policy in the 1950s and raises the question whether the economic system of the Federal Republic of Germany, “Soziale Marktwirtschaft” had any impact on the European policy of the West German state. It argues that Social Market Economy as defined by Ludwig Erhard influenced German European policy in certain aspects, but there was a latent contradiction between the political approach of Konrad Adenauer and this economic concept. Moreover, this article shows that West German European policy was not always as supportive for European unity as it is often considered.

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James C. Van Hook

Economics and economic history have a fundamental role to play in our understanding of Cold War Germany. Yet, it is still difficult to establish concrete links between economic phenomena and the most important questions facing post 1945 historians. Obviously, one may evaluate West Germany's “economic miracle,” the success of western European integration, or the end of communism in 1989 from a purely economic point of view. To achieve a deeper understanding of Cold War Germany, however, one must evaluate whether the social market economy represented an adequate response to Nazism, if memory and perspective provided the decisive impulse for European integration, or if the Cold War ended in Europe because of changes in western nuclear strategy. Economic history operates in relation to politics, culture, and historical memory. The parameters for economic action are often as determined by the given political culture of the moment, as they are by the feasibility of alternative economic philosophies.

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Christopher S. Allen

For much of the past two decades since unification, the literature on the German economy has largely focused on the erosion of the German model of organized capitalism and emphasized institutional decline and the corresponding rise of neoliberalism. The first part of the article analyzes the strains unification placed on German economic performance that caused many observers to call for modification of the model in a more neo-liberal direction. The second part takes a different focus and lays out the main rationale of the paper. It inquires why such a coordinated market economy was created in the first place and whether a renewed form of it might still be useful for Germany, the European Union, and other developed democracies in the early twenty-first century. The third section articulates the origins of the institutional and ideational components of these coordinated market economy models, during both the Bismarckian and Social Market Economy periods. The final portion inquires whether the failure of the contemporary liberal market economy approach in the wake of the worldwide financial crisis and severe recession represents a possible opening for the creation of a third coordinated market economy not only for Germany but for a redesigned European Union.

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A Return to Fashion

Revisiting the German Model

Gregory Baldi

(London: Routledge, 2014) Ştefan Sorin Mureşan, Social Market Economy: The Case of Germany (Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2014). Introduction Ten years ago, writing in a review essay in German Politics and Society , I considered the state of

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Two of the Same Kind?

The Rise of the AfD and its Implications for the CDU/CSU

Matthias Dilling

lost their economic and fiscal competence and their identity as the defender of Germany’s social market economy. On sociocultural grounds, the AfD endorsed positions of traditional morality. They promoted family-oriented welfare policies, an

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The Best of Times, the Worst of Times

Angela Merkel, the Grand Coalition, and “Majority Rule” in Germany

Joyce Marie Mushaben

occurrence). Although she reveres freedom, Merkel does not view “the state” as inherently evil—even established cdu members are uncomfortable with the neoliberal, turbo-capitalism recently adopted by the fdp . The Chancellor’s rediscovery of the “social-market

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Yet Another Grand Coalition

The Social Democrats at the Crossroads

Andreas M. Wüst

policy, education), and the AfD seems to strive primarily to “turn back the clock” to some vague golden age located somewhere between the 1950s and 1980s. The Grand Coalition is representative of a pluralistic, European Germany with the social market

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Jeffrey Luppes, Klaus Berghahn, Meredith Heiser-Duron, Sara Jones, and Marcus Colla

countries’ bilateral foreign policy. Germany still focuses on a social market economy, as pushed by the Social Democrats, Greens, Left Party, and even the Christian Democrats. That makes Germany a different type of economic power than, for example, the

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The “Alternative for Germany”

Factors Behind its Emergence and Profile of a New Right-wing Populist Party

Frank Decker

Neue Soziale Marktwirtschaft (Initiative for a New Social Market Economy), the Bündnis Bürgerwille (Alliance of the Citizens’ Will), the Wahlalternative 2013, and the fundamentalist-Christian campaign network Zivile Koalition (Civil Coalition) set up by

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Tobias Schulze-Cleven

By the 1980s, West Germany’s social market economy ( Soziale Marktwirtschaft ) provided a remarkable institutional infrastructure for worker voice and protection, which effectively ruled out “low-road” corporate strategies that might have sought to