Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 61 items for :

  • Cultural Studies x
  • Anthropology x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Houses for the Curious

Curating between Medicine, Life and Art

Ken Arnold

This article considers a curiosity-driven approach to curating focused on material culture that visitors encounter in physical spaces. Drawing on research into historical curiosity cabinets, it explores how a contemporary notion of curiosity has been put into practice in the new breed of culturally enlightened museums exploring interdisciplinary approaches to medicine, health, life, and art. Based on an inaugural professorial address at Copenhagen University, it reflects on exhibition projects there and at the Wellcome Collection in London. Museums are institutional machines that generate social understanding from material things. Their physical spaces influence how we learn, think, and feel in public; their material collections feed our comprehension, imagination, and emotions; and induce attentive behavior in curators and visitors.

Restricted access

A "Safe Space" to Debate Colonial Legacy

The University of Cambridge Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and the Campaign to Return a Looted Benin Altarpiece to Nigeria

Johanna Zetterstrom-Sharp and Chris Wingfield

In February 2016, students at Jesus College, Cambridge voted unanimously to repatriate to Nigeria a bronze cockerel looted during the violent British expedition into Benin City in 1897. The college, however, decided to temporarily relocate Okukor to the University’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. This article outlines the discussions that occurred during this process, exploring how the Museum was positioned as a safe space in which uncomfortable colonial legacies, including institutionalized racism and cultural patrimony rights, could be debated. We explore how a stated commitment to postcolonial dialogue ultimately worked to circumvent a call for postcolonial action. Drawing on Ann Stoler’s and Elizabeth Edwards’s discussions of colonial aphasia, this article argues that anthropology museums risk enabling such circumvention despite confronting their own institutional colonial legacies.

Restricted access

Making Space for Jewish Culture in Polish Folk and Ethnographic Museums

Curating Social Diversity after Ethnic Cleansing

Erica Lehrer and Monika Murzyn-Kupisz

Looking beyond Poland’s internationally lauded new Jewish museums, this article asks how Jews are represented in longer-standing folk and ethnographic museums whose mandates have been to represent the historical culture of the Polish nation. How have such museums navigated growing internal pressures to incorporate Jews and reconsider the boundaries of “Polishness” alongside external pressures to rethink the function and approach of ethnographic museology? Based on three museums that have taken three different approaches to Jewishness—what we call cabinet of Jewish curiosities, two solitudes, and ambivalent externalization—we assess the roles played by inherited discourses and structures as well as human agents within and beyond the museum. We illuminate how social debate about the character of the nation (and Jews’ place in it) plays out in museums at a moment in their transition from nineteenth- to twenty-first-century paradigms and how a distinctively Polish path toward a “new museology” is emerging in conversation with and resistance to its Western counterparts.

Open access

The Politics of Indigeneity and Heritage

Indonesian Mortuary Materials and Museums

Kathleen M. Adams

In recent decades, museum studies scholarship has highlighted ways in which museums and museum-like heritage spaces are key arenas for articulating, negotiating, and amplifying identities, and for advancing particular (re-)visions of intergroup

Free access

Introduction

Repatriation and Ritual, Repatriation as Ritual

Laura Peers, Lotten Gustafsson Reinius, and Jennifer Shannon

Repatriation—one of the most powerful but undertheorized processes within “museum worlds”—is often portrayed as a space of contestation: Indigenous versus Western, sacred versus secular, science versus religion, colonial control versus cultural

Restricted access

With an Open Mind and Open Heart

Collections Care at the Laboratory of Archaeology

Kate Roth

Department of Anthropology. LOA’s facilities are located both in the Department of Anthropology at UBC as well as the neighboring Museum of Anthropology (MOA) and include laboratories, collections storage spaces (including ancestral housing), offices, and an

Restricted access

Holistic Houses and a Sense of Place

Contextualizing the Bishop Museum Hale Pili Exhibit through Archaeological Analyses

Jennifer G. Kahn

residents of site 7206 had social relations embedded in both time and space. Situating the hale pili in place is meaningful as it re-creates the material setting for past social relations, while its locale speaks to other tangible aspects of place

Restricted access

Margareta von Oswald and Verena Rodatus

the cosmo-optimistic, then, as a progressive set of ideas and aspirations that can inform ways of working in the museum context. As Wayne Modest and colleagues (2017) have suggested, the museum can be regarded as “a space of working through” in which

Open access

Objects as Archives of a Disrupted Past

The Lengnangulong Sacred Stone from Vanuatu in France, Revisited

Hugo DeBlock

considerable collections. The Pavillon des Sessions of the Musée du Louvre exhibits some of the masterpieces of Vanuatu in France, and is a contested exhibition space. Opened in 2000, the Pavillon, from its inception, was meant to serve as an annex to the

Open access

Afterword

The Work of Culture, Heritage, and Musealized Spaces in “Unprecedented Times”

Christina Kreps

contributed to the present troubles. 1 In this new era, what work should culture, heritage, and musealized spaces and those that study them do? While the articles in this special section do not directly address current events, they speak to their underlying