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Valerie Deacon

Arguing that the resistance in France during the Second World War was always transnational in important ways, this piece identifies some of the recent scholarship that has expanded both the temporal and geographic parameters of the French Resistance. It introduces some of the key themes of this collection of articles and underscores the important contributions made by the participating authors. As these articles reveal, we can find sites of transnational resistance by looking at the relationship between the Allies and the resistance, the role that non-French denizens played in the resistance, the politics of cultural resistance, and the circulation of downed Anglo-American aircrews in Europe.

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La flânerie au feuilleton?

Quotidien et modernité critique chez Siegfried Kracauer

Catherine Nesci

de Frances Mossop, Mapping Berlin : Representations of Space in the Weimar Feuilleton (Oxford : Peter Lang, 2015), 32–34. Je précise que cet article a été écrit avant la parution du livre de Mossop. 10 Sur cette illusion médiatique, voir Alain

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L'Express et l'espace après Apollo 11

La dramaturgie du récit journalistique à l'épreuve du spatial

Jérôme Lamy

This article examines the treatment of outer space in the French weekly magazine L'Express from 1969 to 2009. After the Apollo 11 mission to the moon, space was essentially analyzed from the perspective of geopolitics: International tensions, the Cold War, and the emergence of an integrated Europe served as prisms through which the subject of outer space was explored. After the Challenger crash in 1986, thinking about space took on a more commercial orientation; business, trade, and competition became a powerful frame of reference. At the same time, ecological concerns emerged to reinforce a negative view of space exploration. Space debris and the decline of utopian expectations became recurring themes. This cultural history of disenchantment over space reflected both a scaling back of Promethean ambitions and the assimilation of space into everyday life.

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Objects of Dispute

Planning, Discourse, and State Power in Post-War France

Edward Welch

planned developments in terms of land use, urbanization, green space, and transport infrastructure. A commentary of around 250 pages accompanied the map, providing an interpretative gloss and making clear the project’s ambition to prepare Paris for the

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Ivan Jablonka

Translator : Nathan Bracher

and variety of our documentation. Sociologists would be surprised to see how useful archives can be for their work. Historians frequent libraries and archival centers, but they also conduct investigations in time and space, among human beings, through

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Roll Out the Barrel

French and Algerian Ports and the Birth of the Wine Tanker

Owen White

imperial space the French had created. Within this imperial space, locality remained a crucial aspect of economic activity. This was perhaps especially true in port cities, which were characterized, to borrow a phrase from Michael Miller, by a “coexistence

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Margaret Cohen

At the beginning of the twentieth century, due to the spread of helmet diving beyond engineering communities, people started to attend to the remarkable qualities of underwater optics, differing radically from seeing through air. With the revelation of this unfamiliar planetary environment to a broader public, creators across the arts took inspiration from underwater optics to structure fantasy spaces of dream, hallucination, and marvel. To show the properties of underwater optics inspiring these fantasy spaces, this article analyzes undersea paintings by Walter “Zarh” Pritchard, reputedly the first artist to have painted en pleine mer. It then turns to aquatically-inspired works of surrealism, the movement offering the most famous appropriation of underwater optics for the arts, focusing notably on André Breton's L'Amour fou and Jean Vigo's L'Atalante.

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Trajectoires numériques de la chronique judiciaire

DSK et le procès Carlton dans Le Monde, entre écrit et écran

Adeline Wrona

Abstract

This article analyses how the “digitizing” of the press transforms the writing of news in France, through the case of a recent trial, the “Carlton affair” in February 2015. The example chosen is that of Le Monde, which dedicates a blog to legal affairs that is overseen by an experienced journalist who also covers the same questions for the print version of the paper. How does the author take advantage of this double space of publication? Which kind of writing is the freer and the more literary or sophisticated? It appears that web newswriting does not give much importance to the dialog with the reader, but is rather an opportunity to try out ways of telling the story before giving it to the print version. In court journalism the print press still commands the greater prestige and gets more editorial support, whereas blogs or other digital content are used to compensate for the lack of space in the daily press.

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Rosemary Wakeman

This article considers the site and space of Les Halles as an ongoing intellectualfascination. It specifically looks at how architects have historically approachedLes Halles as a “site of modernity” and puts into context the most recent renovationand the architectural competition to design Les Halles in 2004-2005.It will consider the projects and their viability from a cultural perspective andopen the question of the site and the city's future form.

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Creating a Tourist's Paradise

The Marshall Plan and France, 1947 to 1952

Brian A. McKenzie

In 1949, French officials at the Chicago consulate issued an urgent memo to Henri Bonnet, the French ambassador, about the consequences of new French and American programs aimed at promoting transatlantic tourism. Americans, the consul warned, “think that France, and particularly Paris, is becoming the playground of America.”1 Paris, the consul continued, was perceived essentially as a tourist space, a place “where the citizens of the United States can free themselves of all constraints.” He wondered how the American public would ever be able to understand the “difficulties of life faced by the mass of the French population.”