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Andy Leak

Much has been written about Sartre’s views on artistic creativity as communication, but it has less often been remarked that the potential for not-communicating was inscribed from the outset within his theorisation of creation. This article is an exploration of those two apparent opposites, using the psychoanalytic theory of D.W. Winnicott as a counterpoint.

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Patrick Ffrench

Sartre's recollection, in Les Mots, of his first visit to the cinema is a multi-layered and ambivalent text through which Sartre proposes a number of interlocking arguments: concerning the contrast between the 'sacred' space of the theatre and the non-ceremonial space of the cinema, between the theatre as associated with paternal authority, and the cinema as associated with a clandestine bond with the mother. But the text also sets up a quasi-sociological account of the public Sartre encounters in the cinema itself as revealing to him the truth of the social bond, a truth he expresses with the term 'adherence', and which he says he only rediscovered in his experience of being a prisoner in the Stalag in 1940. Rather than the basis of a sociological account of the social bond, which would seem at odds with Sartre's social philosophy, I read this as the expression of a desire for physical proximity. The space of the cinema thus develops a fantasy, and this is in continuity with the role of the cinema in the evolution traced in Les Mots, in which it is described as instigating a withdrawal into imaginary life and an indulgence in daydreaming. Through reference to Christian Metz and to Roland Barthes, whose essay 'En sortant du cinéma' is proposed as a parallel and a response to Sartre, I suggest that the 'true bond' of adherence which Sartre encounters is an unconscious rather than an epistemological truth.

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Adrian van den Hoven

In his lengthy interview with Bernard Dort, published in Sartre on Theater1, the dramatist gives a detailed justification for the theme and setting of his play. His goal was “to demystify heroism – that is, military heroism – by showing its link with limitless violence.” Sartre decided not to situate the action in France “because [he] wanted [to have] a fairly wide audience” and satisfy in that way “an aesthetic need of theater, the need for distancing the object to some extent by displacing it in space in and time”.

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Margaret A. Majumdar

Writing in 1966, Roger Garaudy saw Althusser and Sartre occupying the two poles of contemporary French Marxist thought.1 While no-one would deny their fundamental difference in approach, the fact remains that both were participants in the same project – the modernisation of Marxism in the light of theoretical and political problems which had affected its development, with the aim of achieving an autonomous space for the intellectual to engage with Marxist theory and the practice of the working-class struggle. Both were primarily intellectuals; both were capable of intransigence

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Tim Huntley

This paper looks at Sartre's 1957 papers on Jacopo Tintoretto to examine his reading of action and space in Tintoretto's St George and the Dragon. I suggest that Sartre offers an idea of grace which, far from shoring up a sense of decisive resolution to the action depicted in the painting, speaks instead of an abandonment in the subjective situation. This notion of abandonment appears through the erasure of a conclusive causal point, the disappearance of which lies at the heart of Sartre's reading. Once freed from causal moorings existence is not loosened but rather becomes weighed down in its very situation. Taking support from the work of Levinas this paper considers how Sartre follows the cursive lines of this burdened subjectivity within the deceptive play of Tintoretto's painting.

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Cameron Bassiri

which the articulation of space through organized action is linked to the temporality of the group and in fact serves to ground the phenomenality of the future within the organization. The Origin and Structure of the Organization Sartre begins by stating

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Chiara Collamati

Translator : Marieke Mueller and Kate Kirkpatrick

the necessity of every human society remaining a detotalised totality maintain recurrence, flights and therefore unity-objects as limits to true unification? 5 ] If Sartre does not directly answer these questions, which he relegates to the space of a

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Andrew Inkpin

constituted in each moment by consciousness, so that any apparent transformations are merely ‘projected onto the object’, since ‘every irreal object carr[ies] its time and space with it [and] is presented without any solidarity with any other object […] it has

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The Punctum and the Past

Sartre and Barthes on Memory and Fascination

Patrick Eldridge

, which afford cutting, in a plot dictated by hunger. Consciousness situates itself in a hodological space of possible action. 23 Our situatedness in a nexus of embedded phenomena is characterised by the activity of overcoming obstacles, putting them

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Clare Mac Cumhaill

insightful comments. Notes 1 For more on the distinction between weak and strong formulations of the transparency thesis – strong formulations insist that experience is transparent without remainder – see Matthew Soteriou, ‘The Perception of Absence, Space