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Ester Levanon-Mordoch

This paper examines the presentation of female characters in dramatic roles, in which they appear as representatives of marginalized Jewish immigrants to Israel (olim hadashim, to use the Hebrew term). The two plays examined here were written as criticisms of Israel's double standards concerning the actual acceptance and assimilation of the 'welcomed and longed-for' immigrants, and have hitherto been examined from this perspective. A reading of these plays from the perspective of feminist critique shows that the representation of the central female characters suffers from a pattern of double stereotypical characterization; these characters are stigmatized and stereotyped both in the category of 'women' and in the category of 'unwelcome immigrants'. Thus, in some cases, counterproductively to the playwright's attempt to criticize Israeli institutions and hegemonic society, these representations reveal the stereotypical tendencies inherent in the playwright's own 'transparent' or 'unconscious' world view when it comes to female representation.

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Adia Mendelson-Maoz and Liat Steir-Livny

This article discusses the place of Hebrew and Jewish images and stereotypes in the works of the Israeli-Arab Hebrew writer Sayed Kashua. When describing his Arab protagonists, Kashua portrays both the stereotype of the oppressed Diaspora Jew, who is trying to blend in and hide his identity, and the stereotype of the Israeli Jew, the image that many of Kashua's protagonists aspire to imitate. The article argues that adopting those images and stereotypes has a dual function. On the one hand, it can be understood as an attempt to imitate and internalize the majority's gaze, creating a sense of brotherhood and familiarity with Jewish-Israeli readers. On the other hand, the same images and stereotypes can be understood as having a major subversive thrust that ridicules the Jewish-Israeli identity and its perception of the Israeli-Arab and criticizes the Israelization process among Palestinian citizens of Israel. This subversive dimension, typical of Kashua's sarcastic style, becomes sharper in his more recent works.

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Gadi Benezer

This article discusses the reactions of Israelis in the public space to 'mixed families' that include members of Ethiopian origin, written from the perspective of members of such families. The findings reveal that Israelis still react to the dark skin color of Ethiopians in mixed families and that, in most cases, 'black colors white', that is, behavior toward the mixed family is determined mainly by the presence of its black member. The three typical responses are as follows: (1) expressions of surprise at the presence of an Ethiopian in the family, evincing a stereotypical view of Ethiopian immigrants and their place in Israeli society; (2) invasions of privacy that are perceived by the family members as greatly exaggerated when compared with Israeli norms; and (3) declarations of appreciation for/admiration of the 'white' partner in the family for 'lifting up' the 'black' person through a (supposedly) altruistic act. The major conclusion is that Israeli society has yet to accept mixed families that include Jews of Ethiopian origin as a normative category.

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Beyond the Religious-Secular Dichotomy

Looking at Five Israeli Dystopias

Gideon Katz

This article analyzes different images of Judaism presented in dystopic (anti-utopian) Israeli novels written in two different decades. In the earlier novels, written during the 1980s, Judaism was portrayed as an ancient religion revived by zealots who terrorize Israeli society, Taliban-style. Then I look at the thorough changes that Israeli dystopias have gone through in the last decade: for the first time in this genre, Judaism is imagined in new ways. It is presented as a religion that is not 'frozen' or 'radical'. Its followers are not stereotypical Diaspora Jews, but, rather, representatives of new Jewish identities that are taking shape in current Israeli society. This is emblematic of the deep changes now taking place in Israeli Judaism, particularly the weakening of the traditionally sharp secular-religious dichotomy.

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Daniel Bar-Tal and Yona Teichman, Stereotypes and Prejudice in Con"ict: Representations of Arabs in Israeli Jewish Society Review by Paul L. Scham

Gil Eyal, The Disenchantment of the Orient: Expertise in Arab Affairs and the Israeli State Review by Yoav Gelber

Ariel L. Feldestein, Ben-Gurion, Zionism and American Jewry 1948-1963 Review by Noa Schonmann

Ephraim Kahana, Historical Dictionary of Israeli Intelligence Review by Shlomo Shpiro

Sharon Kangisser Cohen, Child Survivors of the Holocaust in Israel, “Finding !eir Voice”: Social Dynamics and Post-War Experiences Review by Dan Michman

Chaim Noy and Erik Cohen, eds., Israeli Backpackers and their Society: a View from Afar

Chaim Noy, A Narrative Community: Voices of Israeli Backpackers Review by Na’ama She#

Erica B. Simmons, Hadassah and the Zionist Project Review by Marianne Sanua

Oren Yiftachel, Ethnocracy: Land and Identity Politics in Israel/Palestine Review by Zeev Rosenhek

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Ian S. Lustick

-Jewish settlers, equaling approximately 15 percent of all Jews living across the Green Line. Her primary concern is to debunk stereotypical images of American-Jewish settlers as messianic ‘crazies’ or opportunists by uncovering their motivations for “self

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Dan Avnon, Nitzan Lebovic, Raymond Cohen, Elie Friedman, Sara Helman, Gad Barzilai, and Ari Ariel

questions as it answers. Can the state be personified? Can any single factor provide a global explanation of Israeli foreign policy? Is Jewish anxiety not an oversimplified and stereotypical concept? Is it fair to ignore the violent and volatile environment

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Two Patterns of Modernization

An Analysis of the Ethnic Issue in Israel

Shlomo Fischer

of the established, mainly Ashkenazi elites, such as the author and painter Yair Garboz, referred back to old stereotypes and castigated the Likud voters, of whom the Mizrahim are a very visible and major component, for being irrational, magical, and

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Rebranding Desolation

The Allure of Israel’s Desert Landscapes

Amelia Rosenberg Weinreb

insular social networks, lower levels of national assimilation, lower income, lack of local jobs, negative stereotyping, low self-image, weak local place attachment, and years of significant underrepresentation in both political and non-political sectors

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Yuval Gozansky

and establish their own all-girls’ soccer team. In each of its 24 episodes, this realistic drama presents the girls as leaders—smart, entrepreneurial, assertive, and resolute. They manage to overcome gender barriers and shatter gender stereotypes as