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Part 1: Active learning and intercultural competence

Action research reform of a US study abroad programme in Seville, Spain

Eva Infante Mora and Davydd J. Greenwood

CASA-Sevilla is a study abroad programme for US university students with an advanced level of Spanish. In recent years, new patterns of social behaviour among students (mainly the use of technology and low-cost flights) aggravated their difficulties in establishing contacts with the local society, which often resulted in the perpetuation of stereotypes. The programme goals of cultural immersion and language improvement were therefore at risk. Through an action research and a participatory organisational development process, CASA-Sevilla stakeholders carried out a profound reform of the programme, based on the principles of active pedagogy, mentoring and community-engaged learning. This section illustrates this reform process, with its highlights and shadows.

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Eva Infante Mora, Luisa Álvarez-Ossorio Piñero, and Bartolomé Miranda Díaz

This section of the comprehensive account of the action research and pedagogical reform of the CASA-Sevilla study-abroad programme concerns the introduction of community-engaged learning as a way to complement classroom instruction. Some experiential elements were already part of the programme’s previous design (homestays, cultural visits), but they needed to be structured into the curriculum, with clear learning goals and evaluation criteria. In addition, to palliate the obstacles students experienced when trying to establish connections with the local society, service-learning in community organisations was introduced into the core ‘Beyond Stereotypes’ course. This section describes the strategies that were designed to encourage active learning in the homestays, the cultural visits and the participation in community organisations, and the role these elements play in the new programme.

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Sarah Townsend, Anna J. Willow, Emily Stokes-Rees, Katherine Hayes, Peter C. Little, Timothy Murtha, Kristen Krumhardt, Thomas Hendricks, Stephanie Friede, Peter Benson, and Gregorio Ortiz

ANDERSON, E. N., Caring for Place: Ecology, Ideology, and Emotion in Traditional Landscape Management

ÁRNASON, Arnar, Nicolas ELLISON, Jo VERHUNST, and Andrew WHITEHOUSE, eds., Landscapes Beyond Land: Routes, Aesthetics, Narratives

BARNARD, Timothy P., ed., Nature Contained: Environmental Histories of Singapore

BARTHEL-BOUCHIER, Diane, Cultural Heritage and the Challenge of Sustainability

FOOTE, Stephanie and Elizabeth MAZZOLINI, eds., Histories of the Dustheap: Waste, Material Cultures, Social Justice

HAKANSSON, Thomas N. and Mats WIDGREN, eds., Landesque Capital: The Historical Ecology of Enduring Landscape Modifications

PERLMUTTER, David and Robert ROTHSTEIN, The Challenge of Climate Change: Which Way Now?

RUPP, Stephanie, Forests of Belonging: Identities, Ethnicities, and Stereotypes in the Congo River Basin

SODIKOFF, Genese Marie, ed., The Anthropology of Extinction: Essays on Culture and Species Death

SWANSON, Drew A., A Golden Weed: Tobacco and Environment in the Piedmont South

WILBER, Tom, Under the Surface: Fracking, Fortunes, and the Fate of the Marcellus Shale

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Stephanie A. Limoncelli

materials and compose reflection questions to encourage critical thinking and challenge the tendencies of some students to stereotype. They can also work towards ensuring that service-learning is structured in ways that balance student experiences and the

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Eli Thorkelson, Guy Redden, Christopher Newfield, Brigitte Bönisch-Brednich, and Marie-Pierre Moreau

called Latin-American and had to adjust to that all-encompassing stereotype despite having a strong Mexican identity and very little initial knowledge of the South American nations. ‘As technologies of otherness’, so Demuro writes in her chapter

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Seumas Bates

of such a group ( Hartigan 1997 : Wray 2006 ). Thus any negative stereotypes that might have become linked to the “White” label within such a hierarchy can be safely portioned off into this discursively separate grouping ( Hartigan 1997 ; Hurley

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Annika Strauss

are discussed and contextualised in regard to the scene. Which anxieties, fears, irritations, conflicts, projections and defence strategies are evoked by the scene? Which sociocultural practices/habitus may play a role? Which stereotypes (e

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Portrait

J. D. Y. Peel

Marloes Janson, Wale Adebanwi, David Pratten, Ruth Marshall, Stephan Palmié, Amanda Villepastour, and J. D. Y. Peel

Edited by Richard Fardon and Ramon Sarró

action was informed by accounts of historical precedent, and hence how ‘making’ history (oral, ritual, or written) not only could appear to reproduce the social order—a form of stereotypical reproduction—but also was integral to its actual transformation

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Navigating the Politics of Anxiety

Moral Outrage, Responsiveness, and State Accountability in Denmark

Mette-Louise Johansen

. His family were also well known to the social workers in Aarhus owing to their social problems. In other words, this family were stereotypical representatives of the kind of people who cause moral panic in Danish society: the migrant family living on

Open access

Christine Moderbacher

). The feelings of anger and injustice are enforced by dynamics of discrimination, racism, and the stereotypical images conveyed by, lately also international, media. Figure 2. Crossing bridges—the channel between Molenbeek and the Brussels city center